www.nytimes.com

Miami says it can adapt to rising seas. Not everyone is convinced

Officials have a new plan to manage rising water. Succeed or fail, it will very likely become a case study for other cities facing climate threats.
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Climate

Climate change increases flooding risk for some 230,000 Ohio Valley homes

Nearly 20% of homes in West Virginia, 5% in Kentucky and 2.3% in Ohio are at risk of seeing structural damage due to flooding. Combined, this puts more than 230,000 residential properties eligible for federal flood insurance at risk in the Ohio Valley.
www.invw.org
Justice

Mapping climate vulnerability

As part of the yearlong reporting project "Getting to Zero: Decarbonizing Cascadia," InvestigateWest commissioned a set of maps that provide digital windows into vulnerabilities spanning Washington and Oregon that are likely to worsen with climate change.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Climate threats could mean big jumps in insurance costs this year

The federal government is revising rates for flood coverage on April 1. New data suggests premiums need to increase sharply for some homes.
www.bloomberg.com
Justice

How plywood from boarded-up stores gets reused

Wood that businesses once used to protect their property is finding a second life in projects from tiny houses to public art. 
www.nwitimes.com
Justice

Watchdog group: HUD, other agencies failed East Chicago families, children exposed to lead

A federal watchdog says the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and other agencies missed "multiple opportunities" to safeguard residents from lead and arsenic contamination.
www.bloomberg.com
Justice

Beth Osborne, Ben Holland: Electric cars are great. Even better? No cars

The Biden administration is plugging EV adoption to help the U.S. meet its climate goals, but electrification alone won’t do the job: We need to reduce vehicle use, period. 
www.theguardian.com
Climate

The Guardian view on climate progress: The need for speed

The transformation of the US government's stance on the environment is hugely significant. Now the global green recovery must start.

Climate

Weatherization and other energy efficiency tools can save you money and fight climate change

As a reporter covering climate solutions, I receive one query more than any other: "What's the best thing for me to do to protect the planet?" The annoyingly squishy answer is: It depends.

www.nytimes.com
Justice

Hong Kong's first COVID-19 lockdown exposes deep-rooted inequality

The city’s notorious tenement apartments are potential hotbeds of transmission, with their cramped quarters, faulty piping and poor ventilation.
www.theguardian.com
Climate

Warning over mental health effects of floods in the UK

Substantial work still needs to be done to protect houses from flood damage and to ensure homes do not dangerously overheat in summer as climate change intensifies storms and heatwaves in the UK. That is the key message from one of the country's leading experts on climate change adaptation.

Climate

Every Cabinet job is about climate change now

Most departments - from Interior to Transportation - can help reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and improve climate resilience. And with gridlock likely to continue in the closely divided Congress, rulemaking in the executive branch may be the only way to make a difference.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Justin Gillis: What will happen to your next home if builders get their way?

A lobby is trying to block building codes that would help fight climate change.
Climate

Hounded by wildfires, Californians rethink their willingness to rebuild

In the aftermath, some people are deciding to just begin new lives elsewhere. The pandemic and longstanding housing problems haven’t made the choices any easier.
theintercept.com
Justice

Public housing and Superfund: A toxic legacy

More than 9,000 public housing properties are within a mile of a federal Superfund site.
From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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