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Texas grid crisis exposes environmental justice rifts

While the height of Texas' blackouts left more than 4 million homes and businesses without power, some experts say low-income areas and communities of color bore the brunt of much of the crisis.
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Justice

When the grid went dark, Texans faced 3.5M pounds of excess air pollution

Why pollution spiked in frontline communities during the winter storm.
apnews.com
Climate

Power failure: How a winter storm pushed Texas into crisis

Two days before the storm began, Houston's chief elected official warned her constituents to prepare as they would for a major hurricane. Many took heed: Texans who could stocked up on food and water, while nonprofits and government agencies set out to help those who couldn't. But few foresaw the fiasco that was to come.

www.texastribune.org
Toxics

Nearly 12 million Texans face water disruptions. The state needs residents to stop dripping taps

After enduring multiple days of freezing temperatures and Texans dripping faucets to prevent frozen pipes from bursting, cities across the state warned Wednesday that water levels are dangerously low, and it may be unsafe to drink.
www.houstonpublicmedia.org
Justice

‘This is how we defend ourselves’ — Harris County residents install DIY pollution monitoring network

The Houston Ship Channel is the petrochemical capital of the country, but in one city, the state's environmental agency only has one air monitor. So, a group of clean-air advocates in east Harris County are taking matters into their own hands.
www.bloomberg.com
Toxics

How the coronavirus affected biking in U.S. cities

Los Angeles and Houston are hardly cycling capitals. But both saw surges in biking after COVID-19 began, according to new data from the fitness app Strava.

www.washingtonpost.com
Toxics

Coronavirus mutation seen in massive new study of genetic sequences from Houston

The largest U.S. genetic study of the virus, conducted in Houston, shows one viral strain outdistancing all of its competitors, and many potentially important mutations.
Toxics

States, cities, and businesses are making progress on a climate-friendly future

Continued ambitious climate action by U.S. entities could reduce emissions up to 37% by 2030.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Hurricane Laura passed, but disaster still looms for Texas

We survived Hurricane Laura, but the Gulf Coast needs better surge protections for the next one.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Here's what extreme heat looks like: Profoundly unequal

Earth is overheating. This year is poised to be one of the hottest ever. Millions are already feeling the pain, but the agony of extreme heat is profoundly unequal across the globe.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

This is inequity at the boiling point

Earth is overheating. This year is poised to be one of the hottest ever. Millions are already feeling the pain, but the agony of extreme heat is profoundly unequal across the globe.
publicintegrity.org
Justice

A small federal agency focused on preventing industrial disasters is on life support. Trump wants it gone

The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board is without enough voting members, and its investigations are stuck in limbo.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

A climate plan in Texas focuses on minorities. Not everyone likes it

For years, money for flood protection in the Houston area went mostly to richer neighborhoods. A new approach prioritizes minority communities, and it's stirring up resentments.

From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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