publicintegrity.org

Disasters are driving a mental health crisis

From climate-fueled storms to COVID-19, mounting catastrophes are sowing stress and trauma. The country’s one program to help reaches only a fraction of survivors.
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Toxics

Carolinas brace for Isaias as states assess how to plan for storms in a pandemic

Some say they will not go to shelters even if ordered because of coronavirus fears.
www.northcarolinahealthnews.org
Children

Youth voices from Hurricane Florence– Part 2

NC Health News journalists worked with high school students to help them express how they and their families made it through 2018's Hurricane Florence.

www.northcarolinahealthnews.org
Climate

Youth voices from Hurricane Florence

NC Health News worked with high school students to help them write essays on how they and their families made it through Hurricane Florence.
www.northcarolinahealthnews.org
Justice

Robeson County residents still reeling from two prior hurricanes

Nearly three years after Hurricane Matthew, many residents of the state’s second-poorest county are suffering mentally, physically and emotionally.
Toxics

Hurricane Florence debris overwhelms landfills

Landfills in eastern North Carolina are experiencing unprecedented volumes of waste after Hurricane Florence. The backlog is expected to continue for at least several months.
Victor, who shines shoes downtown for work, is "squatting" in his own town house at Trent Court in New Bern. (Credit: Lewis Raven Wallace)
Originals

Lingering long after a storm, mold and mental health issues

Editor's note: This story is part of a series examining the social and health injustices resulting from increasingly intense storms and is the result of a collaboration between EHN and Scalawag Magazine, an independent nonprofit magazine that covers the American South.

Read part 1 here.

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Cheryl Reed outside of her empty townhouse at Trent Court. (Credit: Lewis Raven Wallace)
Originals

Poor southerners are joining the globe’s climate migrants

Editor's note: This story is part of a series examining the social and health injustices resulting from increasingly intense storms and is the result of a collaboration between EHN and Scalawag Magazine, an independent nonprofit magazine that covers the American South.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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