insideclimatenews.org

A pastor taught his church to see a blessing in the devastation of Hurricane Michael

Chester Davis said it was his job after the storm hit in 2018 to keep his parishioners “focused on trusting God and believing in him.”
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Climate

American Climate Video: Hurricane Michael intensified faster than even long-time residents could imagine

Hal Summers thought he and his cat could wait out the storm inside his parents' stone home. He was wrong.

insideclimatenews.org
Climate

American climate video: Al Cathey had seen hurricanes, but nothing like Michael

The mayor of Mexico Beach remembers wondering whether his town could find the energy to recover.
Justice

A job plan built to boost Tallahassee's resilience

A violence-prevention initiative in Tallahassee is also training young people for jobs in community resilience.
Climate

A monster grew in the Gulf of Mexico. Here’s why more may follow

Hurricane Michael grew to Category 5 prowess in an overly warm Gulf of Mexico that likely will continue to heat with climate change.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Hurricane chasers: An immigrant work force on the trail of extreme weather

Itinerant, largely undocumented workers devoted to hurricane recovery in the U.S. have endured shabby housing and haphazard payments.
Climate

FL governor’s wife announces mental health aid for Panhandle ​kids after Hurricane Michael

Florida’s first lady, Casey DeSantis, announced an aid package of state and federal assistance to address concerns of a growing mental health crisis among children in the Panhandle since Hurricane Michael.
newrepublic.com
Justice

Congress is failing Hurricane Michael’s victims

The federal government just upgraded the 2018 storm to Category 5, but lawmakers are still fighting over relief funding—and the Florida Panhandle is still suffering.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Hurricanes are strengthening faster in the Atlantic, and climate change is a big reason why, scientists say

A startling study says that the most devastating storms - those, like Hurricane Michael, which intensify rapidly - are already more common.

theintercept.com
Climate

Climate change refugees share stories of escape in 2018

From California to North Carolina to the U.S.-Mexico border, climate change refugees struggle to survive in an attention economy that has forgotten them.
insideclimatenews.org
Climate

Hurricane Michael cost this military base about $5 billion, just one of 2018's weather disasters

Major hurricanes, devastating wildfires, a drought and a series of extreme storms ran up the count of billion-dollar U.S. climate and weather disasters.
floridapolitics.com
Climate

Most Gulf Power customers back on the grid, but work continues

Panhandle utility company Gulf Power hit its goal of restoring electric service to 95 percent of its customers who can safely receive power by Oct. 24, but the company said there's plenty of work to be done to get the few remaining ratepayers back on the grid.

www.timesunion.com
Climate

A climate wake-up call

A grim U.N. report gives humans just 12 years to act on global warming.

www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Why climate change planning fails

Our well-intentioned climate solutions are making us less safe.
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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