www.circleofblue.org

When it rains, Texas forgets drought and worsening water scarcity

In Texas, dry years reveal a momentous confrontation as residents encounter the menacing consequence of runaway growth.
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ensia.com
Toxics

Heidi Steltzer: To increase trust in science, we need to direct more research dollars to rural America

Pandemic relief funding should provide a much-needed boost to scientific research. And we should steer those dollars toward where they can do the most good.

undark.org
Toxics

Tunnel vision: Lessons in the impermanence of permafrost

In a tunnel beneath the frozen soil of Fox, Alaska, scientists are racing to understand the earth's dwindling permafrost before it is forever gone.
thefern.org
Justice

Praying for rain

The Zuni tribe's homeland is one of the most parched sections of the country. The tribe has already declared three drought emergencies in the last 15 years. Will it survive the next one?

Justice

Officials to meet on Mekong crisis as fishing communities suffer

The Mekong River Commission will meet in Phnom Penh as dams and drought take their toll on the once-mighty waterway.

tucson.com
Justice

New group will battle environmentalists over Vigneto and other projects

The Southwestern Communities Coalition says it will promote "thriving communities, sustainable growth, sound stewardship of natural resources and protection of property rights."
www.nytimes.com
Climate

How oil exploration cut a grid of scars into Alaska’s wilderness

A huge grid covers the landscape just outside the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, from seismic testing for oil and gas. Parts of the refuge itself could soon look the same way.
wset.com
Toxics

Arsenic in groundwater? Virginia coal ash case before court

Virginia's largest electric utility asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to overturn a judge's ruling that the company is violating federal law by discharging arsenic through groundwater into surrounding waters from a coal ash storage site.

Originals

US rivers need a diet of lower salt—or our drinking water will suffer

As an Arctic blast of cold sweeps through most of the U.S., many of us see the salt trucks working hard to keep us safe—however, this generous spreading on the roads is part of a much larger problem in our water.

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From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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