jeff sessions

The EPA wanted to clean up toxic soil in Alabama. Why did a lobbyist, a lawyer and a legislator try to stop them?
www.washingtonpost.com

The EPA wanted to clean up toxic soil in Alabama. Why did a lobbyist, a lawyer and a legislator try to stop them?

The EPA wanted to remove toxic waste from a Birmingham neighborhood, which would have cost tens of millions of dollars. The state’s influence machine kicked into high gear.
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