apnews.com

As extreme weather increases, climate misinformation adapts

Climate scientists have warned for years that a warming planet would cause more extreme storms, like the one that walloped Texas in February, knocking out power and leaving millions in a deep freeze. Yet as the snow fell and the wind howled, some looked for other explanations for the storm and its resulting power outages.

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Originals

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

Environmental Health News reporter Kristina Marusic gives the story behind "Fractured," an investigation of fracking pollution in western Pennsylvania.

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Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash
Climate

Facebook ramps up efforts to dispel climate change misinformation

Facebook says it is stepping up efforts to dispute myths and misinformation about climate change, including adding labels to some posts in the UK.
www.eenews.net
Climate

Greens track deniers ahead of Biden climate push

A coalition of environmentalists is tracking online disinformation about climate change in response to a rising tide of conspiratorial thinking among the American electorate.
Justice

Spiked. BC Profs protest after publisher drops book on Canadian mining

UNBC researchers’ book alleging wrongdoing in Guatemala was accepted, reviewed, then cancelled.
www.businessgreen.com
Toxics

New study urges media outlets to include air pollution data in weather forecasts

Energy giant E.ON is launching a new service to help media outlets include information on air pollution levels in their weather forecasts.

mashable.com
Climate

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus believes we can reverse climate change effects by 2050. Is it possible?

Eric Holthaus, a climate reporter and meteorologist, wants to remind you that you are born at exactly the right time in history to help reverse the damage we have caused our planet.

Photo by Dave Hoefler on Unsplash
Climate

Katrina vanden Heuvel: Media must put the existential threat of climate change front and center

Until recently, the U.S. mainstream media featured more climate silence than climate science.
Originals

Building a library of American environmental classics: Part One

Building best-of lists is, if nothing else, a wonderful way to start an argument.
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thewalrus.ca
Justice

Letter to a young Indigenous journalist.

You will feel alone. You will want to give up. But I urge you to keep going
Photo by Omar Lopez on Unsplash
Justice

Women are more at risk due to the pandemic and climate crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis are two of the world's most urgent issues but while they affect everyone, they also disproportionately impact women and those living in poverty.

Justice

Canada is falling behind on confronting environmental racism

Many First Nations and non-white communities have been the dumping sites for industry. But environmental advocates say Canadians are struggling to empathize.
www.theguardian.com
Food

'One thing I've learned about modern farming – we shouldn't do it like this'

A journalist who has spent decades investigating 'big ag' explains why the drive for cheaper food has come at too high a price.

Justice

A legendary Black environmental group is back and advising Joe Biden

Inside the racist nightmare that led to the founding of the National Black Environmental Justice Network, the devastating death of its first leader Damu Smith, and the political shifts that brought the network back and made it more relevant than ever.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Reporters are leaving newsrooms for newsletters, their own ‘mini media empire’

As newsroom jobs grow scarcer, journalists are building their own platforms via email newsletter.
From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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