www.nytimes.com

Can humans give coronavirus to bats, and other wildlife?

Federal agencies suggest caution in U.S. bat research to avoid transmitting the novel coronavirus to wildlife.
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www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The pandemic claims new victims: Prestigious medical journals

Two major study retractions in one month have left researchers wondering if the peer review process is broken.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Scientists question major hydroxychloroquine study

Experts demanded verification of data and methods used in a study of drugs to treat Covid-19. The study suggested the drugs might have increased deaths.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

What pregnant women should know about coronavirus

The risks, so far, seem no greater than for anyone else, but the research is thin and only applies to later stage of pregnancy.
www.forbes.com
Climate

Maryanne Murray Buechner: Time for a radical rethink on child health

The case for kid-centric solutions to the effects of climate change and other threats to children's health and development.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Climate change poses threats to children's health worldwide

A study from the Lancet points to infectious diseases, worsening air pollution, rising temperatures and even malnutrition as threats to child health as the climate changes. 
www.bbc.com
Toxics

One in 10 child asthma cases 'linked to traffic pollution'

Four million cases of childhood asthma could be caused by air pollution from traffic - around 13% of those diagnosed each year, a global study suggests.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Study warns of cascading health risks from the changing climate

Global warming is posing immediate health hazards around the world and in the United States, from kidney disease to dengue fever, two new studies say.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Study warns of cascading health risks from the changing climate

Global warming is posing immediate health hazards around the world and in the United States, from kidney disease to dengue fever, two new studies say.
Originals

Toxic exposures may cost the world 10% of GDP: Study

The cost of harmful chemical and heavy metal exposures around the world likely tops 10 percent of the global GDP, according to a new study.

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www.washingtonpost.com
Justice

The killer responsible for more yearly deaths than AIDS, malaria and TB combined

A new study linking pollution to millions of premature deaths serves as a reminder that environmental protection is a life-and-death issue.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Jeff Nesbit: Climate change is bad for your health

A leading medical journal warns that the impact of planetary warming on human well-being is “far worse than previously understood.”
From our Newsroom

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Roadmap points Europe toward safer, sustainable chemicals

EU Commission releases ambitious strategy for getting hormone-disrupting chemicals out of food, products, and packaging.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Exempt from inspection: States ignore lead-contaminated meat in food banks

Hunter-donated meat provides crucial protein to US food banks. But an EHN investigation found a lack of oversight that could result in potentially hundreds of thousands of lead-contaminated meals this year.

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