Glamour

It's surprisingly hard to ban toxic sex toys, but here's how to protect yourself.

With the short-term effects of chlorine and the long-term effects of phthalates, PVC is, “definitely one of the worst sex toy materials we’ve seen.”

It's Surprisingly Hard to Ban Toxic Sex Toys, But Here's How to Protect Yourself

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Justice

We used to build things.

We Used to Build Things

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Toxics

California fires leave 31 dead, a vast landscape charred, and a sky full of soot.

SONOMA, Calif. — Some of the worst wildfires ever to tear through California have killed 31 people and torched a vast area of the state’s north this week, but the reach of the blazes is spreading dramatically further by the day, as thick plumes of smoke blow through population centers across the Bay Area.

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Climate

Abandoning Puerto Rico would be an impeachable offense.

By Eugene Robinson Opinion writer October 12 at 7:31 PM

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Climate

Drilling in the Arctic Wildlife Refuge: How the GOP could finally break the impasse.

The Trump administration and congressional Republicans in recent weeks have renewed the fight over opening part of an enormous wildlife refuge in northern Alaska to oil and gas exploration.

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Climate

Members of Congress want a federal audit of the official Puerto Rico death toll.

Two Democratic members of Congress on Thursday requested an audit of the death toll in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, amid concerns that the government is undercounting the number of victims.

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Energy

Beijing philanthropist commits $1.5 billion to conservation.

This Saturday, Oct. 14, in Monaco, He Qiaonv will announce the first step in a $1.5 billion plan that may represent the largest-ever personal philanthropic commitment to wildlife conservation. 

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Zinke's opponents, lacking gavels, turn to complaints.

Opponents of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke are leaning on ethics complaints and requests for watchdog investigations, with the latest accusation targeting a political fundraising company's use of praise Zinke once offered for the company's work.

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Climate

Industry seeks legal cover with replacement rule.

As the Trump administration mulls whether to replace the Obama-era Clean Power Plan, its legal foes are already plotting creative courtroom challenges against U.S. EPA and directly against utilities.

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Toxics

The toxic air covering Northern California.

“It is completely unsafe to be here at this moment,” said Jennifer Franco, a resident of Fairfield, California, on Wednesday afternoon, as massive wildfires ripped through Santa Rosa and Napa a few miles west. But she wasn’t talking about the flames—she was talking about the smoke. Accelerated by high-speed seasonal winds, ash-laden air was blowing eastward, directly into her neighborhood. “Since Tuesday morning, air quality is beyond terrible,” she said. “I’ve been having chest pain, and now I’m using a respirator.”

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Climate

The EPA rips up the Clean Power Plan.

By Editorial Board October 11 at 7:28 PM Follow postopinions

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Climate

Trump’s global resorts put profit first, environment last, critics say.

Donald Trump’s negative environmental record in Scotland and elsewhere has conservationists concerned in Bali, where Trump firms are developing a major resort and golf facility known as Trump International Hotel & Tower Bali.

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Climate

Record Amazon fires stun scientists; sign of sick, degraded forests.

With the fire season still on-going, Brazil has seen 208,278 fires this year, putting 2017 on track to beat 2004’s record 270,295 fires. While drought (likely exacerbated by climate change) worsens the fires, experts say that nearly every blaze this year is human-caused.

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Climate

Everyone knew Houston’s reservoirs would flood — except for the people who bought homes inside them.

by Neena Satija, The Texas Tribune and Reveal, Kiah Collier, The Texas Tribune, and Al Shaw, ProPublica, October 12, 2017

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From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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