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Pollution levels decreased in Maryland during COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed just about everything, including what's in the air we breathe. A new report breaks down the positive difference the effects of pandemic-related restrictions have made on air pollution.

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publicintegrity.org
Toxics

Deadly bacteria lurk in coastal waters. Climate change increases the risks

Health workers see Vibrio as a rare danger, if they’ve heard of it at all. But it’s already causing more cases of flesh-eating disease. And it’s poised to get worse.
www.baltimoresun.com
Justice

Swimming in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor by 2020? No, but maybe 2030, Waterfront Partnership says

Bacteria levels in parts of the Inner Harbor worsened in 2019, but the city's Waterfront Partnership is setting its sights on a harbor swimming area as part of its "2030 Vision."
www.virginiamercury.com
Toxics

Virginia, Maryland, D.C. sue EPA over failure to enforce Chesapeake Bay cleanup plans

Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. filed a lawsuit in federal district court today against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accusing the agency of violating the Clean Water Act by failing to enforce Chesapeake Bay pollution reduction limits for upstream states Pennsylvania and New York.

insideclimatenews.org
Toxics

How Maryland’s preference for burning trash galvanized environmental activists in Baltimore

By some metrics, burning trash can be even dirtier than burning coal, emitting lead, mercury, nitrogen oxides, dioxins and particulate matter associated with increased risk of cardiac and respiratory disease. c

chesapeakebaymagazine.com
Justice

EPA, leaders of Bay States commit to action on diversity

Amid nationwide racial protests and a pandemic that has exacerbated longstanding inequalities, state and federal leaders in the Bay restoration effort took a major step on Tuesday toward healing that divide.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Rising seas could menace millions beyond shorelines, study finds

As climate change raises sea levels, storm surges and high tides will push farther inland, a team of researchers says.
www.washingtonpost.com
Biodiversity

To save the hemlock, scientists turn to genetics, natural predators

A tiny aphid-like insect known as hemlock woolly adelgid has been devastating the trees since the 1970s.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Marine heat wave along East Coast may intensify Hurricane Isaias

Warm waters from a marine heat wave are a major concern with Hurricane Isaias forecast to ride up the eastern seaboard.
ohiovalleyresource.org
Justice

Power failure: A massive bribery scheme could change the Ohio Valley's energy system

The scandal has rocked Ohio politics and could also impact energy policy in the Ohio Valley, as coal and nuclear power generators continue to struggle.
www.baltimoresun.com
Toxics

Maryland’s signature fish is under assault from mercury pollution

EPA enforcement has been largely on stand-down during the pandemic but high amounts of mercury recently detected in Maryland rockfish suggest it will take more than a return to business-as-usual to address worrisome levels of environmental pollution.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Indigenous people face a tragedy in the Amazon during the COVID-19 pandemic

It is time for the international community to center the health and well-being of indigenous people.
Justice

A $550M national class-action settlement includes money for cleanup of PCBs in Baltimore waterways

A $550 million class-action settlement with Monsanto includes money to clean up chemical contamination in Baltimore-area waterways.
apnews.com
Toxics

Researchers predict smaller 'dead zone' in Chesapeake Bay

Researchers are predicting a slightly smaller-than-average oxygen dead zone in the Chesapeake Bay this year. One of the main reasons why is because there was less rainfall washing pollution off of farms and cities and into the nation's largest estuary.

www.baltimoresun.com
Toxics

Got Chesapeake Bay acid? New study finds seagrasses may bring relief

Large beds of underwater grass may be just the cure for one of the problems that ails the Chesapeake Bay.
From our Newsroom

And now, everything the country is not talking about ...

And here's at least one thing to do about it all.

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

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