www.nytimes.com

Rising seas could menace millions beyond shorelines, study finds

As climate change raises sea levels, storm surges and high tides will push farther inland, a team of researchers says.
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www.washingtonpost.com
Biodiversity

To save the hemlock, scientists turn to genetics, natural predators

A tiny aphid-like insect known as hemlock woolly adelgid has been devastating the trees since the 1970s.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Marine heat wave along East Coast may intensify Hurricane Isaias

Warm waters from a marine heat wave are a major concern with Hurricane Isaias forecast to ride up the eastern seaboard.
ohiovalleyresource.org
Justice

Power failure: A massive bribery scheme could change the Ohio Valley's energy system

The scandal has rocked Ohio politics and could also impact energy policy in the Ohio Valley, as coal and nuclear power generators continue to struggle.
www.baltimoresun.com
Toxics

Maryland’s signature fish is under assault from mercury pollution

EPA enforcement has been largely on stand-down during the pandemic but high amounts of mercury recently detected in Maryland rockfish suggest it will take more than a return to business-as-usual to address worrisome levels of environmental pollution.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Indigenous people face a tragedy in the Amazon during the COVID-19 pandemic

It is time for the international community to center the health and well-being of indigenous people.
Justice

A $550M national class-action settlement includes money for cleanup of PCBs in Baltimore waterways

A $550 million class-action settlement with Monsanto includes money to clean up chemical contamination in Baltimore-area waterways.
apnews.com
Toxics

Researchers predict smaller 'dead zone' in Chesapeake Bay

Researchers are predicting a slightly smaller-than-average oxygen dead zone in the Chesapeake Bay this year. One of the main reasons why is because there was less rainfall washing pollution off of farms and cities and into the nation's largest estuary.

www.baltimoresun.com
Toxics

Got Chesapeake Bay acid? New study finds seagrasses may bring relief

Large beds of underwater grass may be just the cure for one of the problems that ails the Chesapeake Bay.
www.baltimoresun.com
Toxics

Maryland to begin testing drinking water, Chesapeake Bay oysters for harmful ‘forever chemicals’ known as PFAS

Maryland is testing drinking water and Chesapeake Bay oysters for the presence of what are known as “forever chemicals," or PFAS.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Racism derails our attempts to fight the climate crisis

Stopping climate change is hard enough, but racism only makes it harder.
www.washingtonpost.com
Climate

Coronavirus: Hurricanes present a dangerous scenario amid the pandemic: Stay at home or risk infection? - The Washington Post

As Tropical Storm Cristobal heads to the Gulf Coast, emergency management officials urge people to evacuate when needed, despite the inherent virus risks.
Toxics

Commission to ask EPA to help cut smog flowing into Maryland

A multi-state commission will ask the federal Environmental Protection Agency to help cut down on pollution that flows from Pennsylvania into Maryland.

Toxics

Maryland sues paper mill for Potomac River pollution

Maryland environmental regulators have filed a federal lawsuit against the owner of the closed Luke paper mill in Allegany County, accusing it of continuing to pollute the North Branch of the Potomac River with toxic contaminants.

stateimpact.npr.org
From our Newsroom

Veeps and the environment

On the environment, Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris are worlds apart. But don't expect it to be front and center in the campaigning.

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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