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Climate

Chesapeake acidification could compound issues already facing the bay, researchers find.

For ten days across recent summers, researchers aboard the University of Delaware research vessel Hugh R. Sharp collected water samples from the mouth of the Susquehanna River to Solomons Island in a first-of-its-kind investigation. They wanted to know when and where the waters of the Chesapeake Bay were turning most acidic.

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Toxics

Washington state requires reporting of 20 additional chemicals in children's products.

The Washington Department of Ecology has added 20 chemicals and deleted three others from the list of substances reportable under the state's Children's Safe Products Reporting Rule.

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Water

Nevada to stop using de-icer linked to tainted water.

Nevada transportation officials announced Tuesday they will stop using a salt-based road de-icing product that has been linked to lead contamination in the water of some Mount Charleston residents.

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Toxics

Pottstown eyeing contaminated land for park.

POTTSTOWN >> Borough council has voted to move ahead with acquiring land at 860 Cross St., which has chemical contamination in the soil and groundwater, for use as part of an expansion of Pollock Park.

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Climate

ICYMI: Syrian seeds shake up Europe’s plant patent regime.

Salvatore Ceccarelli knew he was engaging in a subversive act when, in 2010, he took two 20 kilo sacks of bread and durum wheat seeds from a seed bank outside of Aleppo, Syria and brought them to Italy during a visit back to his home country. Now, seven years later, those seeds from the Fertile Crescent, the birthplace of domesticated agriculture, with thousands of years of evolution behind them, are poised to challenge the system of plant patenting in Europe, and, soon enough perhaps, the United States.

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Kevin Krejci
Toxics

Moms most exposed to pesticides more likely to have preterm babies.

(Reuters Health) - Women exposed to the highest quantities of agricultural pesticides in California’s San Joaquin Valley while pregnant were at heightened risk of giving birth prematurely and delivering low-weight infants, a new study found.

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Toxics

Commentary: Scientific challenges in the risk assessment of food contact materials.

Scientific Challenges in the Risk Assessment of Food Contact Materials

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Toxics

Harvey shines a spotlight on a high-risk area of chemical plants in Texas.

It was 2am Texas time on Thursday when the Arkema chemical plant in Crosby caught fire and exploded. Flooded by ex-Hurricane Harvey’s torrential rains, the plant lost power and refrigeration, and soon thereafter lost control of highly flammable organic peroxides it produces for use in paints and polystyrenes. The explosion cast a 30ft plume of toxic smoke over an evacuated Crosby.

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Justice

Why California’s nitrate problem will take decades to fix.

WHEN FOLKS TALK about “black gold” in California’s Central Valley, it’s usually a reference to oil – unless you’re in the dairy business. No state in the country produces more milk than California, thanks to its 1.7 million cows. Those cows also produce a lot of manure – 120 pounds per cow per day. But manure isn’t a problem; it’s an opportunity, says Ryan Flaherty, director of business partnerships at the San Francisco-based Sustainable Conservation, a nonprofit that works with diverse stakeholders to help clean water, air and land.

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Justice

Sewage, debris, mosquitoes: Flood waters increase health risk for Harvey victims.

Tropical storm Harvey continues to threaten lives in Houston, where officials are focused on evacuating hospitals and securing life-saving emergency transportation, knowing they face long-term health threats.

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Arcos Films/Vimeo
Toxics

How does clean coal work?

• "Clean coal" usually means capturing carbon emissions from burning coal and storing them under the earth.

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Opinion

Can low doses of chemicals affect your health? A new report weighs the evidence.

Toxicology’s founding father, Paracelsus, is famous for proclaiming that “the dose makes the poison.” This phrase represents a pillar of traditional toxicology: Essentially, chemicals are harmful only at high enough doses.

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Toxics

Washington state officials troubled by oilpatch secrets.

Washington state officials troubled by oilpatch secrets

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Toxics

Internal EPA documents show scramble for data on Monsanto's roundup herbicide.

As agrochemical giant Monsanto Co. faces a growing wave of U.S. lawsuits over its top-selling Roundup herbicide line, among its key defense arguments is that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has long backed the safety of the weed-killing products.

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