Winter weather: Road salt use degrading roads, bridges, scientists say

Each year, Americans spread more than 48 billion pounds of salt on roadways to ward off the effects of winter weather. But it comes at a cost.

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Justice

Navy contaminates local groundwater and sewer system in Maryland

PFAS substances linked to cancer have likely leached into drinking water that supplies metropolitan D.C.
www.mlive.com
Toxics

Georgia-Pacific wants to spread the blame for Parchment PFAS pollution

In class action filing, papermaker points the finger at Michigan regulators and other businesses.
www.nj.com
Toxics

The places across New Jersey where too much lead has been found in the water

Drinking water violations from across the state show that New Jersey's lead problem stretches beyond Newark, Trenton and Bergen County.
www.tampabay.com
Population

Once leading the way in Florida, Clearwater's plan to turn wastewater to drinking water is on hold

David Cullen, a lobbyist for the Sierra Club, said the response to booming population growth should be to scale back development, not to look for alternative water sources to sustain overpopulation that is harming natural resources.

www.wsoctv.com
Toxics

New testing begins after chemical linked to thyroid issues found in water at NC school

Scientists were at Lake Norman High School Tuesday to start a second round of testing after perchlorate was detected in the water on campus.

www.mlive.com
Toxics

Ann Arbor, Michigan, OKs new plan to reduce PFAS in city's drinking water

Ann Arbor officials are taking additional steps to ensure city residents are drinking safe water, spending another $850,000 to try to better filter out harmful PFAS chemicals.
www.jsonline.com
Toxics

Waukesha testing pipes and water quality in advance of switching to Lake Michigan supply

Waukesha testing pipes and water quality in advance of switching to a Lake Michigan water supply to prevent a Flint, Michigan-style health crisis.
www.sdnewswatch.org
Toxics

Upgrading wastewater systems a $160 million task in South Dakota

The cost will be borne mostly by state residents whose drinking water could be at stake.

Toxics

Claims filing begins in WV water crisis settlement.

By Ken Ward Jr. Staff writer 10 hrs ago (0)

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Toxics

Trump's Park Service embraces plastic pollution.

Hardly a week passes without a new headline detailing the truly horrific quantity of plastic pollution scattered across our planet. During the final week of September, news broke that scientists were finding floating plastic debris as far north as the Arctic Ocean. Days earlier, NPR broadcast a story about the plastic waste found in common shellfish like clams and oysters. On September 6th, meanwhile, the Guardian published a piece announcing the widespread prevalence of microplastic particles in tap water around the world, the health impacts of which are still largely unknown.

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Toxics

Washington state requires reporting of 20 additional chemicals in children's products.

The Washington Department of Ecology has added 20 chemicals and deleted three others from the list of substances reportable under the state's Children's Safe Products Reporting Rule.

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Climate

California game changers: Can we ban fracking?

If you were to parachute into Kern County about 40 miles west of Bakersfield, you might doubt California’s status as a national leader on climate. Pumpjacks spread out in every direction across a hellscape scraped bare of anything green. Scattered at irregular intervals, spires of latticed steel reach up more than a hundred feet, secured with guy-wires: evidence of hydraulic fracturing, a practice sufficiently infamous that its household nickname, fracking, invokes images of tap water so toxic you can light it on fire.

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Toxics

Nestlé pays $200 a year to bottle water near Flint – where water is undrinkable.

Gina Luster bathed her child in lukewarm bottled water, emptied bottle by bottle into the tub, for months. It became a game for her seven-year-old daughter. Pop the top off a bottle, and pour it into the tub. It takes about 30 minutes for a child to fill a tub this way. Pop the top, pour it in; pop the top, pour it in. Maybe less if you can get gallon jugs.

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Toxics

PWSA looks at pipe coatings to tackle lead problem.

For Pittsburghers trying to guard their tap water from lead, the price can be steep.

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From our Newsroom

Building a library of American environmental classics (Part Two)

More recommendations for your home eco-library.

Disinfection dangers: How to avoid viruses without exposing yourself to toxics

COVID-19 has all of us cleaning more—but the products designed to kill viruses and bacteria can have dangerous health impacts. Here's how to scrub safely.

Algoma Steel workers allege company had ‘full knowledge’ of exposure to lethal, cancer-causing chemicals

Employees and the union allege minimal enforcement by Ontario's Ministry of Labour is to blame for lax oversight at a plant already linked to cross-border air pollution in the region.

Solar power on the rise at US schools

Report finds an 81% increase in K-12 schools using solar power over the last 5 years.

Microplastics in farm soils: A growing concern

Researchers say that more microplastics pollution is getting into farm soil than oceans—and these tiny bits are showing up in our fruits, veggies, and bodies.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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