Wildfires show how climate change is transforming national parks

Drier landscapes, warmer weather, and intensifying fires may change America’s beloved landscapes forever.
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
theconversation.com
Justice

Prakash Kashwan: American environmentalism's racist roots have shaped global thinking about conservation

US ideas about conservation center on walling off land from use. That approach often means expelling Indigenous and other poor people who may be its most effective caretakers.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

We made wildfire an enemy for 110 years. It could have been an ally

Starting with the Big Blowup of 1910, the U.S. Forest Service’s strategy mostly has been to put out fires as fast as possible. With climate change and shifting populations, we’re losing that war.
www.washingtonpost.com
Justice

Kerry-Ann Hamilton: National Parks and the movement for racial equality

As a Black immigrant woman, I often find that national parks can be lonely places. It’s time for that to change.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Death Valley just recorded the hottest temperature on Earth

Scientists still have to validate the reading of 130 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, the equivalent of 54 degrees Celsius.
Justice

This famous California landscape has a complicated history—and a promising future

As conservation groups reckon with racist legacies, some see an opportunity to shed light on Alabama Hills’ Indigenous roots.
www.outsideonline.com
Justice

Are National Parks really America's best idea?

Nature writer David Gessner examines the iconic conservation legacy of Theodore Roosevelt and unpacks the perception that the national parks and monuments he created were previously untouched and empty.

www.nationalgeographic.com
Justice

These people of color transformed U.S. national parks

From Yosemite to Biscayne Bay, these hidden figures helped save natural wonders and historic places.
e360.yale.edu
Justice

More than 500 dams planned in protected areas around the globe, study finds

The study is the first of its kind to quantify the global extent of dams constructed in protected areas, which can include indigenous areas, nature reserves, and national parks.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Your used mask needs to make it to the trash can

They’re on beaches, in parking lots and on sidewalks. You probably won’t catch the coronavirus from a discarded mask, but the litter poses a risk to the environment.
www.postandcourier.com
Climate

Sara Green: Federal act holds promising future for SC public lands and wildlife

South Carolinians and the wildlife that call the Palmetto State home have a promising future thanks to the passage of the Great American Outdoors Act. The bill could be the most important environmental law since the days of Teddy Roosevelt and now is on its way to the president's desk.

Justice

Congress is poised to pass Great American Outdoors Act

A bill that would provide billions of dollars to the National Park Service, the Forest Service and the Land and Water Conservation Fund has been called one of the most important environmental proposals in decades.
www.politico.com
Climate

Bishop warns conservation bill could rob eastern states of forest money

Bishop’s push faces long odds given the Majority Leader Steny Hoyer has already announced a late July vote on the legislation.
www.darlingtonandstocktontimes.co.uk
Biodiversity

Move to end 'ugly glow' pollution spilling into national park

The custodians of a national park look set to work with councils surrounding the protected area to tackle the "ugly glow" of light pollution spilling into the protected area.

e360.yale.edu
Population

Listening to silence: Why we must protect the world's quiet places

As more people push into once-remote areas, truly quiet spots have become increasingly scarce. Now, a coalition of activists, scientists, and park officials are trying to preserve the last quiet places on the planet.

From our Newsroom

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Roadmap points Europe toward safer, sustainable chemicals

EU Commission releases ambitious strategy for getting hormone-disrupting chemicals out of food, products, and packaging.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Exempt from inspection: States ignore lead-contaminated meat in food banks

Hunter-donated meat provides crucial protein to US food banks. But an EHN investigation found a lack of oversight that could result in potentially hundreds of thousands of lead-contaminated meals this year.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.