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Climate change will make world too hot for 60 percent of fish species

Fish are at a far greater risk from climate change than previously thought, as researchers have shown that embryos and spawning adults are more susceptible to warming oceans.

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Toxics

Bees force plants to flower early by cutting holes in their leaves

Hungry bumblebees can make plants flower up to a month earlier than usual by cutting holes in their leaves, which may help them adapt to climate change.

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Climate

Algae transplant could protect coral reefs threatened by warming seas

Heat-resistant algae made in a lab seems to protect coral from bleaching. It could help to save reefs if we fail to tackle global warming fast enough.

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Climate

A Japanese nuclear power plant created a habitat for tropical fish

A small increase in water temperature near a Japanese nuclear power plant allowed tropical fish to colonise the area, suggesting global warming will drastically alter some marine ecosystems.

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Climate

David Attenborough’s A Life on Our Planet is a powerful call to action

David Attenborough's highly personal new documentary A Life On Our Planet allows the nature filmmaker to say what he really thinks about our destructive ways.

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Toxics

AI pollution monitor could forecast harmful particles in the air

Most air pollution forecasts are based on maps of annual emissions and models of chemical reactions, but an AI could help predict more specific forecasts.
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Climate

UK government refuses request to explain cost of hitting net zero

The UK government has refused a request to explain why its estimated cost of reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 is tens of billions of pounds more than its independent advisers found.

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Toxics

Tackling air pollution may accidentally trigger serious health issues

Cities tackling one major air pollutant risk inadvertently making things worse by fuelling the growth of another, potentially more harmful type of pollution.

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Toxics

Chinese air quality regulations could put an end to 'new car smell'

The chemical compounds that make up “new car smell” can be harmful, and they have been found in new cars at levels 10 times higher than recommended limits
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Toxics

We constantly eat microplastics. What does that mean for our health?

Tiny particles of plastic are in our food, water and even the air we breathe. There is insufficient evidence to establish the impact of microplastics on human health. But the absence of evidence doesn't mean they are harmless.

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Toxics

Australian government to be sued over firefighting foam contamination

Up to 40,000 residents of towns contaminated with chemicals from firefighting foams are set to sue the Australian government, making it the biggest class action lawsuit in the country's history. There are fears that the chemicals may increase the risk of cancer.

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Toxics

Changing a child's route to school can halve exposure to air pollution

A study of five London schools found a clear difference in exposure to levels of harmful nitrogen dioxide when children travelled via quieter roads
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Climate

Some corals ‘killed’ by climate change are now returning to life

Warm water can leave corals looking dead – but in some cases polyps still survive deep in the coral skeleton and in time they can return the coral to life.

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Toxics

Giant boom traps plastic waste from the oceans for the first time

Boyan Slat of The Ocean Cleanup says that after a failure last year, his giant v-shaped boom system is now collecting plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

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Climate

Climate change will boost risk of extreme flooding in northern Europe

Climate change will increase the risk of heavy rainfall and storm surges combining to cause extreme flooding around the UK, Germany and other parts of northern Europe.

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Chesapeake Energy's fall

Chesapeake Energy was a fracking pioneer on a meteoric rise. Last week, it fell to Earth.

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

In an effort to bolster our health, we may be exposed to compounds that harm us. New research says physicians need to recognize and explain this hidden risk to patients.

Our annual summer reading list, 2020 edition

EHN staff shares their top book recommendations for the summer.

Coronavirus is creating a crisis of energy insecurity

Fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has led to unpaid bills and energy shutoffs in many vulnerable US households. Indiana University researchers warn we need to act now to avoid yet another health emergency.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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