www.nytimes.com

How many plants have we wiped out? Here are 5 extinction stories

Botanists have laid out evidence that dozens of North American trees, herbs, plants and shrubs have gone extinct since European settlers arrived.
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Biodiversity

How many plant species have gone extinct in North America?

A new paper identifies 65 plant extinctions in the continental United States and Canada — but that’s just a fraction of what we’ve lost.
e360.yale.edu
Climate

North American biomes are losing their resilience, with risks for mass extinctions

The resilience of plant biomes is declining — indicating that today's landscapes are "primed to herald a major extinction event" not seen since the retreat of glaciers and arrival of humans 13,000 years ago, scientists reported in a new study.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Can humans give coronavirus to bats, and other wildlife?

Federal agencies suggest caution in U.S. bat research to avoid transmitting the novel coronavirus to wildlife.
e360.yale.edu
Toxics

A new tool visualizes environmental changes during pandemic

Space agencies in the United States, Japan, and the European Union have collaborated to create a new tool that visualizes environmental changes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

ensia.com
Justice

Indigenous seed banks are helping to preserve culture, boost nutrition and protect the environment

From Guatemala to Oklahoma, communities are tackling multiple challenges by saving seeds of traditional agricultural crops.

insideclimatenews.org
Climate

New study shows global warming intensifying extreme rainstorms over North America

The current warming trajectory could bring 100-year rainstorms as often as every 2.5 years by 2100, driving calls for improved infrastructure and planning.
www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

A new viral outbreak is killing rabbits

This virus is deadly, long-lived and highly contagious, but it doesn’t affect people or other animals.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

What’s wrong with butterflies raised in captivity?

A study suggests that monarchs bred by enthusiasts were less fit than those that started as caterpillars in the wild.
www.nationalgeographic.com
Justice

Pete Muller: As climate change alters beloved landscapes, we feel the loss

The environment’s chaotic transformation is damaging many of our favorite places—and causing a shared ‘homesickness’.
www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Once, America had its own parrot

The Carolina parakeet was beautiful, and doomed. What could have driven it to extinction?
www.nationalgeographic.com
Climate

High mountain ‘water towers’ are in trouble

These high "water towers" provide a huge percentage of global fresh water, but climate change and geopolitical stresses endanger their existence.
www.news.com.au
Climate

Climate change: Australia seen as ‘disconnected from reality’ on world stage

Australia has sent Energy Minister Angus Taylor to the final days of a climate summit in Spain, where senior figures from around the world are likely to look at him in dismay.
ensia.com
Justice

Should countries and cities generate energy by burning trash?

As the world's garbage piles up, controversy over waste-to-energy incineration continues.

From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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