www.thetimes.co.uk

Childhood obesity may be linked to dirty, noisy roads

Children living in urban areas with high levels of air pollution, noise and traffic may be at higher risk of childhood obesity, a study suggests.

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Justice

Will the U.S. finally take a holistic approach to ending child hunger?

Spurred by the pandemic and the Biden administration's priorities, a new federal paradigm may be emerging to ensure equitable access to healthy meals.
civileats.com
Justice

Palm oil is in almost everything we eat, and it's fueling the climate crisis

In her new book, 'Planet Palm,' journalist Jocelyn Zuckerman investigates the devastating environmental, health, and human costs of the global palm oil industry.
www.scientificamerican.com
Toxics

Consequences of DDT exposure could last generations

Scientists found health effects in grandchildren of women exposed to the pesticide.

Photo by freestocks on Unsplash
Toxics

Prenatal POP exposure may increase the risk of metabolic disorders in adolescence

Exposure before birth to persistent organic pollutants (POPs)-- organochlorine pesticides, industrial chemicals, etc.--may increase the risk in adolescence of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and high blood pressure.
Justice

Indoor dust contains PFAS and other toxic chemicals

A new study of indoor dust found PFAS and other toxics that can lead to infertility, diabetes, obesity, abnormal fetal growth, and cancers.
ensia.com
Justice

The environmental justice issues around access to urban nature

Compared to affluent white communities, lower-income communities and communities of color are missing out on the advantages urban greenery provides. What does it take to level the playing field?

Justice

Air pollution kills millions every year, like a 'pandemic in slow motion'

Dirty air is a plague on our health, causing 7 million deaths and many more preventable illnesses worldwide each year. But the solutions are clear.
www.nytimes.com
Children

Are some foods addictive?

Food researchers debate whether highly processed foods like potato chips and ice cream are addictive, triggering our brains to overeat.
undark.org
Justice

Are conservative policies shortening American lives?

Americans have shorter lives than international peers. Some researchers now say conservative policies may be to blame.
www.dw.com
Toxics

Light pollution: The dangers of bright skies at night

Artificial light revolutionized life on earth. But as our nights grow increasingly bright, its negative impacts are becoming ever more visible on our health and on nature.
Justice

Editorial: In issuing new dietary guidelines, Trump once again spurns science

Experts’ recommendations that Americans lower sugar and alcohol intake are ignored even as the pandemic magnifies the harm from obesity.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

U.S. diet guidelines sidestep scientific advice to cut sugar and alcohol

The government’s new nutritional recommendations arrive amid a pandemic that has taken a huge toll on American health.
From our Newsroom

Alabama PFAS manufacturing plant creates the climate pollution of 125,000 cars

The manufacturing plant responsible for PFAS-coated fast food packaging pumps out loads of a banned ozone-depleting compound along with "forever chemicals."

LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter featured on "We Can Be" podcast

"I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good."

Weaponization of water in South Asia

Climate change and unbalanced regional political power are driving an ongoing water crisis in Bangladesh.

Global action on harmful PFAS chemicals is long overdue: Study

"We already know enough about the harm being caused by these very persistent substances to take action to stop all non-essential uses and to limit exposure from legacy contamination."

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Pennsylvania vows to regulate PFAS in drinking water—again—but regulations are at least two years away

The chemicals, linked to health problems including cancer and thyroid disease, have contaminated drinking water in Pittsburgh communities like Coraopolis and McKeesport.

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