Glamour

It's surprisingly hard to ban toxic sex toys, but here's how to protect yourself.

With the short-term effects of chlorine and the long-term effects of phthalates, PVC is, “definitely one of the worst sex toy materials we’ve seen.”

It's Surprisingly Hard to Ban Toxic Sex Toys, But Here's How to Protect Yourself

Keep reading... Show less
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD

Could Zika become a cancer treatment?

The Zika virus struck fear into the hearts of parents and would-be parents, last year. Moms who were infected during pregnancy often gave birth to babies with serious birth defects, including small brains. A number of the problems linked to the disease came from how the virus impacted the developing nervous system. But someday, Zika might also gain renown as a medical therapy — to treat deadly brain cancers.

Keep reading... Show less
Editorial

Superfund tax is gone, but corporate pollution remains.

Oh, the Superfund program created in 1980 was a very good idea. Industries and businesses would be held accountable, through taxes, for polluting communities all over the United States. Those taxes – paid by landfill owners, chemical companies and industrial manufacturers – paid for cleanups of polluted sites, an often expensive proposition.

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Agent Orange, exposed: How U.S. chemical warfare in Vietnam unleashed a slow-moving disaster.

In the end, the military campaign was called Operation Ranch Hand, but it originally went by a more appropriately hellish appellation: Operation Hades. As part of this Vietnam War effort, from 1961 to 1971, the United States sprayed over 73 million liters of chemical agents on the country to strip away the vegetation that provided cover for Vietcong troops in “enemy territory.”

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

SF to ban sale of upholstered furniture containing flame retardants linked to cancer.

San Francisco is expected to ban the sale of upholstered furniture with flame retardant chemicals.

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Trading old hazards for new?

Industry and government officials say PFOA, the toxic chemical blamed for contaminating drinking water supplies in Hoosick Falls and several other area communities, is no longer used in manufacturing in the United States.

Keep reading... Show less

Deadly West Nile virus cases are spiking in LA. The first line of defense: Chickens.

By USHA LEE MCFARLING @ushamcfarling SEPTEMBER 29, 2017

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Agent Orange still linked to hormone imbalances in babies.

Exposure to Agent Orange sprayed during the Vietnam War has been linked to increased levels of certain hormones in women and their breastfeeding children decades later, potentially putting them at higher risk of health problems, according to a new study in Science of the Total Environment.

Keep reading... Show less

The Zika virus grew deadlier with a small mutation, study suggests.

It remains one of the great mysteries of the Zika epidemic: Why did a virus that existed for decades elsewhere in the world suddenly seem to become more destructive when it landed in Latin America?

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Coffee sold in California could carry cancer warning labels.

Coffee sold in California could carry cancer warning labels

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

EPA removes waste at Texas toxic sites, won’t say from where.

By Michael Biesecker | AP September 23 at 10:44 PM

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Toxic town.

When Susie Worley-Jenkins survived cervical cancer after being diagnosed at 22 years old, she hoped that she was done with the disease. It was 1979, and she had no idea what was coming.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate

Move over malaria: Mosquitoes carrying Zika, dengue may thrive in warmer Africa.

by Kieran Guilbert | KieranG77

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Taxpayer dollars fund most oversight and cleanup costs at Superfund sites.

By Bryan Anderson September 20 at 7:25 PM

Keep reading... Show less
Toxics

Trump nominee for EPA chemical safety post has deep industry ties.

President Donald Trump's nominee to oversee chemical safety at the Environmental Protection Agency has for years accepted payments for criticizing studies that raised concerns about the safety of his clients' products, according to a review of financial records and his published work by The Associated Press.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Bhopal nocturne

35 years after the chemical industry's worst accident, have we learned any lessons? A petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River suggests we haven't.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.