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The pandemic has taken cars off urban streets. Will it last?

With a sharp drop in auto traffic due to the coronavirus, cities around the globe have closed streets to cars and expanded pedestrian thoroughfares and bike lanes. But as life edges back to normal, will these initiatives survive?

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Justice

In the walking capitals of the world, drivers still rule the road

In sub-Saharan Africa, about half of travelers move around by foot. Yet in its cities, conditions for pedestrians remain incredibly dangerous.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Thinking of buying a bike? Get ready for a very long wait

The United States is facing a shortage of bicycles as anxiety over public transportation and a desire to exercise has sent the demand surging.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Streets should be car-free during lockdown. And after

Cholera changed the face of Paris. Will Covid-19 change the streets of New York?
Toxics

Coronavirus lockdowns make cities more walkable

Urban experts say walkability demands may be hard to reverse after restrictions on movement in cities imposed because of coronavirus are lifted.

Justice

4 cheap ways to make urban transportation better

City leaders: Before buying a hyperloop, maybe fix your sidewalk?
Climate

How many lives could car-free 'superblocks' save?

If fully implemented, the plan to recapture 70 percent of street space for pedestrians could have an enormous public health impact.
From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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