www.texasobserver.org

As Texans are exposed to dangerous pesticides, lawmakers aren't doing anything

Pesticide drift is exposing rural Texans to dangerous chemicals. But lawmakers are more concerned with how that is eating into Big Ag’s balance sheet.
Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Justice

Idaho lawmakers move to slash pesticide protections

The House Agricultural Committee unanimously voted to strike several rules that regulate spray from aerial applicators like crop-dusters.

investigatemidwest.org
Toxics

This was the next step on our pesticide drift project

Last week, we hosted a discussion regarding our pesticide drift sensor project.

Toxics

Brexit may expose Britons to more pesticides

Fear that fall in food standards after UK leaves EU regulatory system could allow farmers to use more chemicals.

www.civilbeat.org
Toxics

Heart disease may be linked to pesticide exposure

A new look at data from a historic study of elderly Japanese Americans points to a potential link between pesticide exposure and the development of cardiovascular disease.
www.civilbeat.org
Justice

Monsanto could soon be facing dozens of lawsuits in Hawaii over pesticide

Massive damage awards in previous cases are triggering a new onslaught against the chemical company.
www.rcinet.ca
Toxics

Insecticide effect on wild bees

Neonicotinoids, one of the most popular insecticides in agricultural use worldwide, has often been claimed as a major factor in commercial bee colony collapse.

www.usnews.com
Justice

California launches app for reporting pesticide exposure

The nation’s top agricultural producing state receives hundreds of pesticide complaints a year.
Justice

Fresno County farm workers exposed to chemicals while at work

Several dozen farm workers were exposed to pesticides Thursday, June 27, 2019, in Fresno County CA, the second time such incident occurs this month.
news.yahoo.com
Toxics

Swiss men have sperm counts which are among lowest in Europe

Related problems included motility issues, low sperm count or abnormal cells.
Credit: Annie Spratt/Unsplash
Originals

Weed killer residues found in 98 percent of Canadian honey samples

As U.S. regulators continue to dance around the issue of testing foods for residues of glyphosate weed killers, government scientists in Canada have found the pesticide in 197 of 200 samples of honey they examined.

Keep reading... Show less
www.thenation.com
Toxics

More than 90 percent of Americans have pesticides or their byproducts in their bodies

The real risks from chemicals in our food—for farmworkers and children, in particular—are being ignored.
time.com
Toxics

A mother's exposure to pesticides during pregnancy may raise children's autism risk

Scientists found that pregnant women living within a 2,000 meter radius of a highly sprayed area were anywhere from 10% to 16% more likely to have children diagnosed with autism.

www.onmedica.com
Toxics

ASD risk higher with prenatal exposure to pesticides

Prenatal exposure to common agricultural pesticides is associated with a small to moderately increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

www.thecalifornian.com
Justice

Tanimura & Antle issued proposed fine for care of sickened farmworkers

More than a year after 17 farmworkers were sicked in a suspected pesticide exposure in Salinas fields, Tanimura & Antle has been issued a proposed fine of $5,000 for failing to immediately take them to medical care when they were ill.

From our Newsroom

Veeps and the environment

On the environment, Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris are worlds apart. But don't expect it to be front and center in the campaigning.

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.