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The sponge with the secret recipe: A cancer-fighting chemical

A common sea sponge growing in Indonesian waters produces a chemical called manzamine A that has been shown to fight cervical cancer cells in the lab.

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Toxics

What's in the water? A breakdown of some of the pollutants around Montreal

The St. Lawrence River is the lifeblood of Montreal, providing a commercial highway for shipping, drinking water and, for many, a recreational playground.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The pandemic claims new victims: Prestigious medical journals

Two major study retractions in one month have left researchers wondering if the peer review process is broken.
www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Tests for coronavirus vaccine need this ingredient: Horseshoe crabs

Modern medicine still depends on this animal’s blood to test for bacteria in vaccines. And an alternative test requires further study.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Trump’s inaccurate claims on hydroxychloroquine

The president falsely described scientific research around the malaria drug, falsely denied the existence of a federal warning against it and argued, with no evidence, that large numbers of health care workers were taking it.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Trump’s vaccine chief has vast ties to drug industry, posing possible conflicts

Moncef Slaoui, a former pharmaceutical executive, is now overseeing the U.S. initiative to develop coronavirus treatments and vaccines. His financial interests and corporate roles have come under scrutiny.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Rick Bright, the coronavirus whistle-blower who said the Trump administration steered contracts to cronies

Rick Bright, the ousted chief of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency, said he was pressured to steer millions of dollars to the clients of a well-connected consultant.
Toxics

Little known about non-natural chemicals increasingly being found in environment

Pesticides, ingredients from sunscreen, an artificial sweetener and the plasticizer bisphenol-A,were among the chemicals found.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Trump’s aggressive advocacy of malaria drug for treating coronavirus divides medical community

While Dr. Anthony Fauci has urged caution in using hydroxychloroquine, some doctors are prescribing it to patients who have the virus despite the fact it has never been tested for it.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Covid-19 changed how the world does science, together

Never before, scientists say, have so many of the world’s researchers focused so urgently on a single topic. Nearly all other research has ground to a halt.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Creatures in this underwater forest could save your life one day

Before this 60,000-year-old submerged forest disappears, scientists recently raced to search for shipworms and other sea life that might conceal medicine of the future.
Justice

The unseen survivors of thalidomide want to be heard

The U.S. was supposed to have escaped the devastation of a drug that caused birth defects in babies overseas. This is the almost forgotten story of its toll in America.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The virus can be stopped, but only with harsh steps, experts say

Scientists who have fought pandemics describe difficult measures needed to defend the United States against a fast-moving pathogen.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

With minimal evidence, Trump asks FDA to study malaria drugs for coronavirus

The president cites “tremendous promise” for existing drugs, but their use against the new virus is unproven.
From our Newsroom

The dangers of opinion masquerading as fact in science journals: Jerrold J. Heindel

A call for unbiased, honest science in peer-reviewed journals.

Join the “Agents of Change” discussion on research and activism

Four of the fellows who participated in the program this year will discuss their ongoing research, activism, and experiences with publishing their ideas in the public sphere.

Big Oil flows a little bit backward

Pipelines have had a very bad July (so far).

Beyond the “silver lining” of emissions reductions: Clean energy takes a COVID-19 hit

With job loss and stifled development in the renewable energy sector, economists, politicians, and advocates say policy action is necessary to stay on track.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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