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Climate

Giant lizards, hissing ducks, and pythons: Florida has an invasive species problem

Should Floridians welcome their new bizarre menagerie or fight back? A dispatch from an extremely Florida war.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Scientists say new strain of swine flu virus is spreading to humans in China

A new study warns that the strain of H1N1, common on China’s pig farms since 2016, should be “urgently” controlled to avoid another pandemic.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Meat plant closures mean pigs are gassed or shot instead

Coronavirus outbreaks at meatpacking plants have created a backlog of animals ready for slaughter but with nowhere to go. Farmers are having to cull them.
www.washingtonpost.com
Toxics

The next pandemic is already coming, unless humans change how we interact with wildlife, scientists say

The global wildlife trade, agricultural intensification, deforestation and urbanization are bringing people closer to animals, giving their viruses more of what they need to infect us: opportunity.
Toxics

What are zoonotic diseases?

Zoonotic diseases, which pass from animals to humans, kill millions of people every year. Where do they come from and how can we avoid them?
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The agriculture queens of Louisiana

As climate change threatens exports like oysters and rice, residents cling to a pageant tradition that celebrates them.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Yanzhong Huang: Why did one-quarter of the world's pigs die in a year?

Swine fever devastated China’s stock because with unsound governance, even sound regulations have perverse effects.
www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Feral pigs roam the South. Now even northern states aren’t safe.

The swine have established themselves in Canada and are encroaching on border states like Montana and North Dakota.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Denmark raises antibiotic-free pigs. Why can’t the US?

American pigs are raised on a liberal diet of antibiotics, fueling the rise of resistant germs. Danish pork producers are proving there’s a better way.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

South Korea stops stream of blood from culled pigs

Towns near the border with North Korea were alarmed when a stream turned red after pigs were culled over fear of African swine fever.
www.bbc.com
Water

South Korean river turns red after being polluted with pigs' blood

Some 47,000 pigs were killed near the inter-Korea border to stop the spread of African swine fever.
www.newsweek.com
Food

Trump administration's new hog slaughterhouse rules may risk 'more contamination and food safety recalls'

The updated procedures let meat companies kill pigs as quickly as they want and pass inspection responsibilities from government officials to plant employees.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Tainted pork, ill consumers and an investigation thwarted

Drug-resistant infections from food are growing. But powerful industry interests are blocking scientists and investigators from getting information they need to combat the problem.
www.ozy.com
Food

Swine fever hits Chinese villages hard

African swine fever is ravaging rural Chinese communities that have for decades depended on raising pigs.
From our Newsroom

Researchers, doctors call for regulators to reassess safety of taking acetaminophen during pregnancy

The painkiller, taken by half of pregnant women worldwide, could be contributing to rising rates of reproductive system problems and neurodevelopmental disorders like ADHD and autism.

LISTEN: Azmal Hossan on the sociology of climate crises in South Asia

"If we look at the rate of carbon emissions, most is emitted by the developed and industrialized countries, but the problem is poor countries like Bangladesh are the main sufferers."

Op-ed: We don’t have time for another fossil fuel bridge

Those holding up carbon capture and hydrogen as new climate solutions are leading us down the wrong path.

Climate storytelling: Creativity and imagination in the face of bleak realities

Working with youth writers on a climate-fiction screenplay has opened my eyes to the power of the arts in confronting environmental crises.

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Peter Dykstra: Protected by an alphabet soup of acronyms

CITES, CCAMLR, LDC, MBTA, CBD, Ramsar, LWCF ... they may make your eyes glaze over, but they protect our health and planet.

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