www.nytimes.com

Scientists say new strain of swine flu virus is spreading to humans in China

A new study warns that the strain of H1N1, common on China’s pig farms since 2016, should be “urgently” controlled to avoid another pandemic.
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Climate

Meat plant closures mean pigs are gassed or shot instead

Coronavirus outbreaks at meatpacking plants have created a backlog of animals ready for slaughter but with nowhere to go. Farmers are having to cull them.
www.washingtonpost.com
Toxics

The next pandemic is already coming, unless humans change how we interact with wildlife, scientists say

The global wildlife trade, agricultural intensification, deforestation and urbanization are bringing people closer to animals, giving their viruses more of what they need to infect us: opportunity.
Toxics

What are zoonotic diseases?

Zoonotic diseases, which pass from animals to humans, kill millions of people every year. Where do they come from and how can we avoid them?
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The agriculture queens of Louisiana

As climate change threatens exports like oysters and rice, residents cling to a pageant tradition that celebrates them.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Yanzhong Huang: Why did one-quarter of the world's pigs die in a year?

Swine fever devastated China’s stock because with unsound governance, even sound regulations have perverse effects.
www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Feral pigs roam the South. Now even northern states aren’t safe.

The swine have established themselves in Canada and are encroaching on border states like Montana and North Dakota.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Denmark raises antibiotic-free pigs. Why can’t the US?

American pigs are raised on a liberal diet of antibiotics, fueling the rise of resistant germs. Danish pork producers are proving there’s a better way.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

South Korea stops stream of blood from culled pigs

Towns near the border with North Korea were alarmed when a stream turned red after pigs were culled over fear of African swine fever.
www.bbc.com
Water

South Korean river turns red after being polluted with pigs' blood

Some 47,000 pigs were killed near the inter-Korea border to stop the spread of African swine fever.
www.newsweek.com
Food

Trump administration's new hog slaughterhouse rules may risk 'more contamination and food safety recalls'

The updated procedures let meat companies kill pigs as quickly as they want and pass inspection responsibilities from government officials to plant employees.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Tainted pork, ill consumers and an investigation thwarted

Drug-resistant infections from food are growing. But powerful industry interests are blocking scientists and investigators from getting information they need to combat the problem.
www.ozy.com
Food

Swine fever hits Chinese villages hard

African swine fever is ravaging rural Chinese communities that have for decades depended on raising pigs.
newfoodeconomy.org
Food

On cows, condos, and the limits of urban agriculture

As city dwellers have decided to embark on the path of urban agriculture, more and more of them have brought the animals, too.
Food

Facial recognition software for pigs in China — ′I want to see the scientific evidence′

If planet Earth had just five pigs, three would be in China. So the spread of a deadly swine disease there is especially worrying. Will facial recognition software help stop African swine fever? We have asked a vet.
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