Toxic time bombs.

Decades of evidence point to the untoward health effects of endocrine disruptor exposures, yet little is being done to regulate the chemicals.

Hormones—chemical messengers secreted by internal (endocrine) glands to control body functions—were discovered as the 20th century began, launching the field of endocrinology. Within a few decades, several natural steroids including the sex hormones estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone had been identified. But since the 1930s, we have been increasingly exposed to many endocrine disruptors—artificial organic substances that mimic natural hormones and can threaten human health.

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Toxics

Chemists remove 99 per cent of BPA from water in 30 minutes.

Our water is full of BPA, a potentially dangerous chemical, but chemists at Carnegie Mellon University may have a solution.

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Marufish/flickr
Originals

BPA breakthrough: New treatment takes controversial chemical out of water.

As water treatment plants struggle to keep up with the chemical cocktail heading into our pipes, researchers say they’ve come up with a solution to remove one of the most ubiquitous contaminants—BPA.

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Toxics

Eco-friendly plastics made using lemon extracts, CO2.

London, Jul 17 (PTI) Scientists have developed eco- friendly plastics using lemon extracts and carbon dioxide that may replace potentially cancer-causing materials widely used in everyday items like phone cases, baby bottles and DVDs.

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Toxics

EU moves to restrict hormone-disrupting chemical found in plastics.

Green groups welcome ‘historic’ ruling recognising that bisphenol A (BPA), found in TVs, plastic water bottles and kettles, poses a threat to human heath

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Toxics

Recycling car plastics using coconut oil.

DAILY SCIENCE

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Mark Morgan/flickr
Toxics

BPA-free plastic may host BPA-like chemical, teen finds.

Plastics advertised as ‘BPA-free’ may contain the potentially toxic BPF instead

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Opinion

Am I consuming BPA?

You have probably seen the label "BPA-free" on plastic bottles, food and beverage cans and other plastic food packaging materials. Have you wondered what exactly is BPA and why we are commonly seeing this label on our products recently? And what does this mean to the health and safety of consumers? Herein I will explain the chemistry of BPA and its replacement compound BPS, and I will provide some tips on how to avoid eating these potentially harmful man-made chemicals.

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Mark Morgan/flickr
Originals

BPA-free? Substitutions mimic hormones in breast cancer cells.

Three chemicals used as BPA alternatives mimic estrogen and promote breast cancer cell growth more than the controversial compound they're designed to replace, according to new research.

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Toxics

The ‘safer' plastics designed to replace BPA may be just as bad for you.

A chemical called BHPF—found in some ‘BPA-Free’ plastics—may cause harmful outcomes in mice, according to a study published Tuesday in Nature Communications.

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Children

Rules of evidence.

Are evidence standards used by chemical regulators excluding solid science?

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Children

Pregnant women drinking from plastic water bottles could be driving up their risk of having obese babies.

Pregnant women who drink from plastic bottles are more likely to have obese children, a new study claims.

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Appvion
Originals

US workers making BPA have enormous loads of it in them.

US workers making BPA have enormous loads of it in them

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Toxics

How plastics cause autism, diabetes, cancer, birth defects.

Recent studies have associated the rise in autism, diabetes, cancer and birth defects to increase in the use of plastics in making everyday containers, toys and baby teethers or pacifiers.

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Senate Democrats
Originals

Toxic economy: Common chemicals cost US billions every year.

Exposure to chemicals in pesticides, toys, makeup, food packaging and detergents costs the U.S. more than $340 billion annually due to health care costs and lost wages, according to a new analysis.

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From our Newsroom

Bhopal nocturne

35 years after the chemical industry's worst accident, have we learned any lessons? A petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River suggests we haven't.

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