Everyone knew Houston’s reservoirs would flood — except for the people who bought homes inside them.

Despite concerns about flooding in and around the Addicks and Barker reservoirs, government officials prioritized development.

by Neena Satija, The Texas Tribune and Reveal, Kiah Collier, The Texas Tribune, and Al Shaw, ProPublica, October 12, 2017

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Toxics

A small town in Texas. A huge explosion. An unsolved mystery — and the long road back.

WEST, Tex. — If her son hadn’t stowed that damn ’66 Chevrolet Impala in her garage, Jeanette Holecek would have died the day her town exploded. But its sloping steel bulk was in just the right place, at just the right time, and it shielded her from the concussion that shattered her home.

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Toxics

Complaints surge about weed killer dicamba’s damage to oak trees.

As soybean and cotton farmers across the Midwest and South continue to see their crops ravaged from the weed killer dicamba, new complaints have pointed to the herbicide as a factor in widespread damage to oak trees.

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Climate

Texas company seeks to renew permit to look for Big Cypress oil.

By Eric Staats, eric.staats@naplesnews.com; 239-263-4780

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Climate

Goodbye - and good riddance - to livestock farming.

What will future generations, looking back on our age, see as its monstrosities? We think of slavery, the subjugation of women, judicial torture, the murder of heretics, imperial conquest and genocide, the first world war and the rise of fascism, and ask ourselves how people could have failed to see the horror of what they did. What madness of our times will revolt our descendants?

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Joshua Mayer
Toxics

Strips of native prairie plants could reduce pollution runoff from farm fields.

Strips Of Native Prairie Plants Could Reduce Pollution Runoff From Farm Fields

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Energy

Interior Department to overhaul Obama's sage grouse protection plan.

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration will seek to reconsider an Obama-era blueprint for protecting the greater sage grouse, a move that could lead to new mineral leasing, grazing and other commercial activities across the quirky bird’s Western habitat.

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Climate

Many homeowners unaware they lived in reservoir 'flood pools.'

The two earthen dams were erected by the Army Corps of Engineers in the 1940s to protect downtown Houston after flooding wrecked the city in 1935. Unlike traditional "lake-forming" dams, the reservoirs are not clearly defined and are dry much of the year. The water they impound during heavy rains sprawls west across flatland into what was once open prairie. The flood pool grows depending on rainfall and on how much water the Army Corps releases through the dams' gates.

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Justice

Niki Ashton has a plan to fix Trudeau's 'patchwork' of green funding.

It's time for direct federal government intervention to drive Canada's transition to a greener economy, says NDP leadership candidate Niki Ashton.

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Climate

In Canada, climate change could open new farmland to the plow.

In Canada, climate change could open new farmland to the plow

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Energy

Deaths of farmworkers in cow manure ponds put oversight of dairy farms into question.

JEROME, Idaho — Alberto Navarro Munoz had been working on the farm for only two weeks when he encountered one of the most gruesome hazards that a dairy worker can face. His tractor tipped over into a pit of cow manure, submerging the Mexican native under several feet of a “loose thick somewhat liquid-like substance,” according to the police report documenting his death in southern Idaho.

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Toxics

Concern grows over effects of treated seeds on birds.

Minnesota researchers are finding cause for concern about the effects on wild birds of neonicotinoid insecticide, which has been linked to bee losses for nearly a decade.

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From our Newsroom

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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