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Justice

The hidden toll of July Fourth fireworks

Many fireworks set off over the Fourth of July can cause regional air pollution levels to spike and remain elevated for several days, posing a potentially serious health risk to vulnerable populations.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Air pollution's invisible toll on your health

Children, pregnant women, the elderly and those with pre-existing heart or lung disease are the most vulnerable.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

EPA to review rules on soot linked to deaths, which Trump declined to tighten

The Biden administration says it will consider tougher limits on a deadly air pollutant that disproportionately affects low-income and minority communities.
www.nationalgeographic.com
Justice

In California, extreme heat and ozone pollution hit poor communities hardest

A new study identifies places in the state where the climate-intensified health risks are linked.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Indonesian lawsuit seeks court’s help in pollution battle

A district court in Indonesia’s capital is expected to rule soon in a suit accusing the president and top officials of failing to curb pollution.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

How climate change may affect your health

No matter where you live or how high your socioeconomic status, climate change can endanger your health, both physical and mental, now and in the future.
newrepublic.com
Justice

Kill coal to save lives

It’s time to finish what the Obama administration started. It’s time to finish off coal.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Wildfire smoke is poisoning California's kids. Some pay a higher price

Fires are making the state’s air more dangerous. How much that hurts depends largely on where you live and how much money your family has.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Abandoned Rio Tinto mine is blamed for poisoned Bougainville rivers

Residents of the Papua New Guinea region have accused the mining giant of environmental and human rights violations and asked for an investigation.
Toxics

The West Coast had the world’s most polluted cities in September

Wildfire smoke poisoned the air in California, Oregon, and Washington State for more than a week. Here's what it means for public health.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

We’ll have to learn to live with smoke. Here's why

There’s a huge fire debt in the West that must be paid off, experts say, either through controlled burns or out-of-control blazes. Either way, that means smoke.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Getting climate into the presidential debates

The first of three debates between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is Tuesday, and some activists and lawmakers want a guarantee that, unlike 2016, climate change will be on the agenda.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

‘This does not look good for children': Fires pose risk to young lungs

The wildfires blazing in the West could hinder developing lungs, worsen asthma and even lead to the condition in those who don’t have it but are genetically disposed to it.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Wildfire smoke is dangerous. Here's how to protect yourself.

Smoke spreads misery, including health problems, far beyond fire zones. Wildfire smoke, which can include toxic substances from burned buildings, has been linked to serious health problems.

From our Newsroom

Op-ed: We don’t have time for another fossil fuel bridge

Those holding up carbon capture and hydrogen as new climate solutions are leading us down the wrong path.

Climate storytelling: Creativity and imagination in the face of bleak realities

Working with youth writers on a climate-fiction screenplay has opened my eyes to the power of the arts in confronting environmental crises.

Peter Dykstra: Protected by an alphabet soup of acronyms

CITES, CCAMLR, LDC, MBTA, CBD, Ramsar, LWCF ... they may make your eyes glaze over, but they protect our health and planet.

Alabama PFAS manufacturing plant creates the climate pollution of 125,000 cars

The manufacturing plant responsible for PFAS-coated fast food packaging pumps out loads of a banned ozone-depleting compound along with "forever chemicals."

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter featured on "We Can Be" podcast

"I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good."

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