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To save the hemlock, scientists turn to genetics, natural predators

A tiny aphid-like insect known as hemlock woolly adelgid has been devastating the trees since the 1970s.
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Climate

Marine heat wave along East Coast may intensify Hurricane Isaias

Warm waters from a marine heat wave are a major concern with Hurricane Isaias forecast to ride up the eastern seaboard.
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Climate

Indigenous people face a tragedy in the Amazon during the COVID-19 pandemic

It is time for the international community to center the health and well-being of indigenous people.
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Climate

Coronavirus: Hurricanes present a dangerous scenario amid the pandemic: Stay at home or risk infection? - The Washington Post

As Tropical Storm Cristobal heads to the Gulf Coast, emergency management officials urge people to evacuate when needed, despite the inherent virus risks.
Toxics

As Italy shuts down from the novel coronavirus, air pollution declines steeply

What happened in China is already happening in another country with a major outbreak.
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Climate

Solar panels on historic houses: Climate change activists clash with preservationists

Homeowners who want solar panels confront skepticism from local preservation boards in the District and across the country.
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Justice

Racism has devastating effects on children’s health, pediatricians warn

“It’s a new age of racism,” a doctor says. Her patients are suffering the consequences.
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Climate

Paul Thacker:  Why we shouldn’t take peer review as the ‘gold standard’

It’s too easy for bad actors to exploit the process and mislead the public
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Biodiversity

Trump administration quietly makes it legal to bring elephant parts to the U.S. as trophies

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will allow sport hunters to receive permits for the trophy items on a “case-by-case basis.”
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Climate

The Invisible Killer: The rising global threat of air pollution-and how we can fight back

Two new books explore the alarming prevalence of air pollution and its risks to human health.
From our Newsroom

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Roadmap points Europe toward safer, sustainable chemicals

EU Commission releases ambitious strategy for getting hormone-disrupting chemicals out of food, products, and packaging.

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