www.nationalgeographic.com

Greta Thunberg reflects on living through multiple crises in a 'post-truth society'

In an exclusive interview with National Geographic, the teen climate activist considers the successes of the youth climate movement and the challenges it will face.
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www.nationalgeographic.com
Toxics

The ‘infodemic’ of COVID-19 misinformation, explained

False information about the pandemic is rampant, but seasoned defenders of climate science can offer tips for how to fight it.
thebulletin.org
Climate

What science and democracy have in common: Us, hopefully

Science, like democracy, is a social process that relies upon a shared commitment to underlying principles. And like democracy, it collapses if enough of the participants decide they don’t want to play by the rules any more.
Toxics

Lindsey J. Leininger, Harold Pollack: Public health experts need to communicate better with conservatives

People in our field are supposed to identify our blind spots. But we missed a big one, and it's hurting the public response to the pandemic.
stateimpact.npr.org
Climate

Scientist spotlight: Dr. Camille Gaynus finds climate connections in coral reefs

As part of StateImpact Pennsylvania’s focus on climate change, American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Fellow Donna McDermott spoke to scientists about their connection to one of the world’s critical issues.
stateimpact.npr.org
Climate

Dr. Aja Carter, who studies dinosaurs, says climate change is outpacing animals’ ability to evolve

As part of StateImpact Pennsylvania’s focus on climate change, American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Fellow Donna McDermott spoke to scientists about their connection to one of the world’s critical issues.
stateimpact.npr.org
Climate

Scientist spotlight: Penn State’s Ellie Nasr on how wetlands can mitigate effects of climate change

As part of StateImpact Pennsylvania’s focus on climate change, American Association for the Advancement of Science Mass Media Fellow Donna McDermott spoke to scientists about their connection to one of the world’s critical issues.
Toxics

No matter what the CDC says, here’s why many scientists think the coronavirus is airborne

The change on Monday was the third time the CDC posted coronavirus guidance or recommendations only to reverse its stance. In the spring, it revised information about contact transmission within days of publishing it.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Advice on virus transmission vanishes from C.D.C. website

The new guidance, published only on Friday, had acknowledged that fine particles floating in air may spread the virus.
www.propublica.org
Climate

What the photos of wildfires and smoke don't show you

The West will need “good fire” — controlled, managed fire that balances the ecosystem — to stave off deadly, out-of-control fire. We need to know what that looks like.
Toxics

Why misinformation about COVID-19’s origins keeps going viral

Another piece of coronavirus misinformation is making the rounds. Here’s how to sift through the muck.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

U.S. health officials tiptoe around Trump's vaccine timetable

The administration’s experts tried to find a way to support both the president and the reality of scientific and medical constraints he doesn’t always recognize.
publicintegrity.org
Toxics

Analysis: Trump administration's coronavirus advice is secret, fragmented and contradictory

Private calls and unpublished reports leave many Americans and local officials in the dark.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

FDA ‘grossly misrepresented' blood plasma data, scientists say

Many experts — including a scientist who worked on the Mayo Clinic study — were bewildered about where a key statistic came from.
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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