www.fastcompany.com

Ecobuilder lets players help solve real-world ecological problems

In EcoBuilder, you build your own ecosystems of plants and animals, adding in species of different sizes and deciding who eats whom. Scientists are looking at the successful games to see what they can learn about how the planet works.
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Originals

WATCH: Agents of Change discuss writing, research, and activism

Four of the fellows who participated in the Agents of Change program this year joined the Collaborative on Health and the Environment to discuss their research, activism, and experiences with publishing their ideas.

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www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Misleading coronavirus video, pushed by the Trumps, spreads online

Social media companies took down the video within hours. But by then, it had already been viewed tens of millions of times.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The doctor behind the disputed COVID data

Dr. Sapan Desai, who supplied the data for two prominent and later retracted studies, is said to have a history of cutting corners and misrepresenting information in pursuit of his ambitions.
theconversation.com
Toxics

Todd Newman: Science elicits hope in Americans – its positive brand doesn't need to be partisan

When you ask Americans what the word 'science' brings to mind, a majority respond 'hope.' Using this built-in brand can help communicate important science messages.
Toxics

Michael B. Eisen, Robert Tibshirani: How to identify flawed COVID-19 research before it's too late

Scientists and journalists need to establish a service to review research that’s publicized before it is peer reviewed.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

How Facebook handles climate disinformation

Critics say a company policy that exempts opinion articles from fact-checking amounts to a huge loophole for climate change deniers.
Toxics

Bipartisan group of former government officials demand science-based approach to pandemic

Officials from the Trump, Obama and George W. Bush administrations all signed the statement, underscoring the widespread concern over Trump’s response to a pandemic that has claimed the lives of more than 127,000 Americans so far.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Health officials had to face a pandemic. Then came the death threats

State and local health officials have found themselves at the center of regular news briefings amid the coronavirus outbreak, making them targets for harassment and threats.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

NOAA chief violated ethics code in furor over Trump tweet, agency says

Neil Jacobs violated the agency’s scientific integrity policy with a statement last year backing the president’s inaccurate claim that a hurricane was headed for Alabama, a panel found.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

The CDC waited 'its entire existence for this moment.' What went wrong?

The technology was old, the data poor, the bureaucracy slow, the guidance confusing, the administration not in agreement. The coronavirus shook the world's premier health agency, hampering the U.S. response to the crisis.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

How to read a coronavirus study, or any science paper

Published scientific research, like any piece of writing, is a peculiar literary genre.
www.propublica.org
Toxics

“Immune to Evidence”: How dangerous coronavirus conspiracies spread

Conspiratorial videos and websites about COVID-19 are going viral. Here's how one of the authors of “The Conspiracy Theory Handbook" says you can fight back.

From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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