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Pandemic highlights deep-rooted problems in Indian Health Service

Few hospital beds, lack of equipment, a shipment of body bags in response to a request for coronavirus tests: The agency providing health care to tribal communities struggled to meet the challenge.
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Justice

For the Navajo Nation, a fight for better food gains new urgency

As the pandemic has brought home the importance of the global movement for food sovereignty, members are planting and sharing.
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Justice

How you get your berries: Migrant workers who fear virus, but toil on

Many laborers in New Jersey follow the ripening of crops up the East Coast. Each influx of new workers brings the risk of a fresh outbreak.
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Climate

Jonathan Safran Foer: The coronavirus and a world without meat

If you care about the working poor, about racial justice, and about climate change, you have to stop eating animals.
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Toxics

Thinking of buying a bike? Get ready for a very long wait

The United States is facing a shortage of bicycles as anxiety over public transportation and a desire to exercise has sent the demand surging.
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Justice

Sunnie R. Clahchischiligi: Nowhere is remote anymore

Coronavirus in the Navajo Nation exposes underlying vulnerabilities.
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Toxics

The food chain's weakest link: Slaughterhouses

A relatively small number of plants process much of the beef and pork in the United States, and some of them have closed because workers are getting sick.
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Justice

How Native Americans are fighting a food crisis

As the coronavirus limits access to food, many are relying on customs, like seed saving and canning, that helped their forebears survive hard times.
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Toxics

Coronavirus in N.Y.C.: Region is now an epicenter of the pandemic

New York City and its suburbs account for roughly 5 percent of global cases, forcing officials to take urgent steps to stem the outbreak.
Toxics

Shortages of masks, swabs and supplies hinder coronavirus testing

Major hospitals are grappling with a shortage of tests and other supplies.
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Climate

The merchants of thirst

In Nepal and many other countries, private tanker operators profit from growing water scarcity.
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Justice

How racism ripples through rural California’s pipes

In the 20th century, California’s black farmworkers settled in waterless colonies. The history endures underground, through old pipes, dry wells and shoddy septic tanks.
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Food

Gulf oysters are dying, putting a southern tradition at risk

Cheap and plentiful, they’ve long been a menu staple in New Orleans and beyond. But recent months have brought a crisis that worries fishermen and chefs.
From our Newsroom

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Roadmap points Europe toward safer, sustainable chemicals

EU Commission releases ambitious strategy for getting hormone-disrupting chemicals out of food, products, and packaging.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Exempt from inspection: States ignore lead-contaminated meat in food banks

Hunter-donated meat provides crucial protein to US food banks. But an EHN investigation found a lack of oversight that could result in potentially hundreds of thousands of lead-contaminated meals this year.

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