Don’t consign poor countries to wild storms and flooding.

Wealthy nations caused the problem but are not doing enough to solve it.

DON’T CONSIGN POOR COUNTRIES TO WILD STORMS AND FLOODING

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Climate

How a seed bank, almost lost in Syria's war, could help feed a warming planet.

TERBOL, Lebanon — Ali Shehadeh, a seed hunter, opened the folders with the greatest of care. Inside each was a carefully dried and pressed seed pod: a sweet clover from Egypt, a wild wheat found only in northern Syria, an ancient variety of bread wheat. He had thousands of these folders stacked neatly in a windowless office, a precious herbarium, containing seeds foraged from across the hot, arid and increasingly inhospitable region known as the Fertile Crescent, the birthplace of farming.

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Toxics

EPA approves plan to remove San Jacinto Waste pits from river.

EPA approves plan to remove San Jacinto Waste pits from river

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Toxics

EPA admits PCB in Minden.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host open public meetings at Glen Jean later this month to discuss results of PCB soil and water samples taken around Minden and Fayetteville in May and June, Acting Regional EPA Director Cecil Rodrigues said Thursday.

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Toxics

Former US military base sites in South Korea heavy with contamination.

Almost 2/3 of environmental surveys since 2008 have revealed high pollution in water and soil

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Climate

Beyond biodiversity: A new way of looking at how species interconnect.

In 1966, an ecologist at the University of Washington named Robert Paine removed all the ochre starfish from a short stretch of Pacific shoreline on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The absence of the predator had a dramatic effect on its ecosystem. In less than a year, a diverse tidal environment collapsed into a monoculture of mussels because the starfish was no longer around to eat them.

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Climate

Wildfires: How they form, and why they're so dangerous.

As deadly wildfires continue to rage across Northern California’s wine country, with winds picking up speed overnight and worsening conditions to now include a combined 54,000 acres of torched land, it now seems more important than ever to understand how wildfires work, and their lasting implications on our health and the environment.

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Climate

For Algeria's struggling herders, "drought stops everything."

By Yasmin Bendaas

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Toxics

Every Tasmanian fire station to be tested for toxic foam contamination.

EVERY major fire station in Tasmania is being investigated for potential contamination from toxic chemicals used in firefighting foam — described as “the Agent Orange of firefighting”.

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Climate

Fall armyworm arrives in Africa on the heels of climate change.

Tobias Okwara is a farmer in Kayoro Parish in southeastern Uganda. In the midst of a long drought that began in May 2016, he and his neighbors got together to discuss what to do. Food was becoming scarce, and they hoped to recover quickly once the rains started again. They decided they would pool their meagre resources and plant a large communal field of maize. By spring 2017, the rains had finally returned, and their maize was thriving.

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Climate

The palm oil fiefdom.

This is the first installment of Indonesia for Sale, an in-depth series on the corruption behind Indonesia’s deforestation and land rights crisis.

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Climate

Record Amazon fires stun scientists; sign of sick, degraded forests.

With the fire season still on-going, Brazil has seen 208,278 fires this year, putting 2017 on track to beat 2004’s record 270,295 fires. While drought (likely exacerbated by climate change) worsens the fires, experts say that nearly every blaze this year is human-caused.

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Climate

Another victim of Hurricane Maria: Puerto Rico's treasured rainforest.

Another Victim of Hurricane Maria: Puerto Rico’s Treasured Rainforest

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Food

On superior farmlands, limited appetite for local food.

In hyper-fertile Central Illinois, sustainable farmers seek local support, but end up trekking their wares to Chicago.

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amy dejong
Toxics

Trump’s pro-coal agenda is a blow for clean air efforts at Texas' Big Bend park.

Big Bend national park is Texas at its most cinematic, with soaring, jagged forest peaks looming over vast desert lowlands, at once haughty and humble, prickly and pretty. It is also among the most remote places in the state.

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From our Newsroom

Bhopal nocturne

35 years after the chemical industry's worst accident, have we learned any lessons? A petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River suggests we haven't.

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