www.theguardian.com

Schemes boosting cycling and walking accelerate across the UK

One of the first "low-traffic neighbourhoods" to be created in the UK was in Hackney, east London, in the early 1970s, when residential roads were closed to through traffic but remained open to local residents, pedestrians and cyclists.

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Toxics

Particles from air pollution found in placentas of pregnant women: study

Potentially toxic carbon- and metal-rich air pollution particles from street traffic have been found in the placentas of pregnant women for the first time, according to new research.

www.yorkshirepost.co.uk
Toxics

Sheffield leaders halted clean air zone amid fears drivers would 'pay to pollute'

Political leaders in Sheffield have been urged to prepare for when pollution levels rise again post-pandemic after halting plans to introduce a clean air charging zone in the city.
Toxics

EPA, Utah settle Gold King Mine spill lawsuit

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes have announced that a settlement agreement has been reached over the Gold King Mine spill that happened five years ago.

www.bloomberg.com
Toxics

How London's low-traffic streets keep cars at bay

To curb cars and boost biking and walking, the city is rolling out low-traffic neighborhoods, with streets closed to non-local drivers. Not everyone is a fan. 
www.businessinsider.com
Climate

CDC pushes for cars over mass transit amid coronavirus

The federal government would like companies to incentivize driving to work - preferably alone. The guidelines counter what scads of public health and environmental programs have pushed for decades.

www.miamiherald.com
Toxics

Diesel exhaust can increase your risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, study says

New research adds to speculations that traffic-related pollution can contribute to Parkinson's disease by damaging brain cells.

Toxics

Will commuters ever go back to commuter trains?

No form of public transportation has lost more riders in the coronavirus crisis than the trains that carry suburban workers to urban jobs. Will they ever recover?
www.theguardian.com
Biodiversity

Traffic noise reduces bats' ability to feed

The thunder of road traffic is likely to drive away bats, according to a study, which found vehicle noise caused bat activity to decrease by two-thirds.

www.denverpost.com
Toxics

Colorado sees "significant declines" in air pollution as coronavirus ramps down driving, industrial activity

At least temporarily, air pollution that hurts human lungs has decreased sharply along Colorado’s Front Range as the novel coronavirus spreads.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Traffic and pollution plummet as US cities shut down for coronavirus

In cities across the United States, traffic on roads and highways has fallen dramatically over the past week as the coronavirus outbreak forces people to stay at home and everyday life grinds to a halt. Pollution has dropped too.

Toxics

Highway expansions hit a new wall of resistance

Adding lanes for “traffic relief" remains politically popular. But in Houston and Portland, highway expansions are facing an energized - and effective - local resistance.

www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Grizzly bear death rates are climbing

Trains, cars and poaching have all contributed to a soaring number of fatalities, prompting fears for the grizzlies’ future.
Toxics

Truck traffic is affecting the Lehigh Valley's air quality, a new study finds.

Across the country and in the Lehigh Valley, air quality is declining as vehicle use increases with population growth, enforcement of environmental regulations softens and climate change exacerbates pollution.

From our Newsroom

Climate change will continue to widen gaps in food security, new study finds

Countries already struggling with low crop yields will be hurt most by a warming climate.

The chemical BPA is widespread on beaches around the world

"When we lie on the beach, we're not only lying on a bed of sand but a bed of plastics."

Why environmental justice needs to be on the docket in the presidential debates: Derrick Z. Jackson

If you want to talk about the inequality in our economy, COVID-19, race, and silent violence in our cities, you need to start with environmental injustice.

Our plastic planet

While climate change remains environmental issue #1, the worries over plastic in our water, soil, food, and bodies continue to grow.

Microplastics in farm soils: A growing concern

Researchers say that more microplastics pollution is getting into farm soil than oceans—and these tiny bits are showing up in our fruits, veggies, and bodies.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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