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Indigenous Maori and western scientists work through past injustices to save a threatened species

Threatened by a foreign pathogen, iconic kauri trees find allies in cross-cultural collaboration.

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Climate

Helping the environment, one small sensor at a time

New York City nonprofits are using a cloud-based service from the start-up Temboo that helps monitor storm-water runoff and other environmental factors.
paenvironmentdaily.blogspot.com
Toxics

Ad Crable: State pollution goal aims to put the 'sylvan' back in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania, under criticism by fellow Chesapeake Bay drainage states for being far behind in meeting pollution reduction goals, has turned to trees in a big way to make up ground.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Human activity devastated the American chestnut. Can we bring it back?

The tree helped build industrial America before an estimated three billion or more were destroyed. To repair the damage, we may need to embrace tinkering with nature.
www.mlive.com
Climate

40,000 trees being planted to help West Michigan forests through climate change

The $375,000 project aims to keep existing forests healthy and to plant new and resilient forests.
www.forbes.com
Climate

How a trillion more trees could combat climate change

One of the low-tech ways of fighting climate change is to plant more trees. Today, I discuss that idea in detail with an expert from the University of Washington.
cosmosmagazine.com
Climate

More signs of the pressure on our environment

A new study suggests that mature forests are limited in their ability to absorb "extra" carbon as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase, which has implications for climate change modeling.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Superfund, meet super plants

Can the plant microbiome help clean up contaminated land?
Source Image: ilyakalinin/iStock
Climate

Which trees should planners plant in cities to fight pollution?

Placing trees between roads and pedestrians can make life way healthier, but some trees perform their task better than others.
Toxics

Longing for the great outdoors? Think smaller

Access to parks, nature, and wildlife is critical for physical and emotional well-being. Now some city dwellers sheltered at home must find it in new ways.  
Climate

How dead trees help forests tolerate drought

Some forests, particularly in more arid regions, have become more drought tolerant, primarily thanks to the death of less hardy trees.
www.telegraph.co.uk
Climate

Why a walk in a forest is the perfect antidote to anxiety

Not only do trees offer the potential of salvation from the ravages of climate change, but they are also a font of mindfulness and well-being, resources that surround all of us, and that we need now – more than ever – during these times of anxiety and isolation.

www.yaleclimateconnections.org
Climate

The pros and cons of planting trees to address global warming

It seems like such a simple, straightforward, empowering idea: plant trees - a lot of trees - all over the world, and watch the planet's temperature fall.

www.bbc.com
Climate

'UK's first tiny forest' helps urban environment

A "tiny forest" - said to be the first of its kind in the UK - is being planted in Oxfordshire in a bid to tackle urban wildlife loss.

From our Newsroom

Of water and fever

While we're rightly distracted by fighting a virus, are we ignoring other "just" wars over water?

Coronavirus, the environment, and you

How the spread of the deadly virus is impacted by climate change, the environment, and our lifestyles.

Stop and smell—and look at—beautiful flowers

If you've been unable to visit botanical gardens or flowering trails, here's a spring journey.

Reevaluating fish consumption advisories during the COVID-19 pandemic: Analysis

Our current crisis reaffirms the importance of weighing the health benefits of eating fish against chemical exposure risks.

‘Them plants are killing us’: Inside a cross-border battle against cancer and pollution

Two communities — one in Canada, one in the U.S. — share both a border along the St. Marys River and a toxic legacy that has contributed to high rates of cancer. Now the towns are banding together to fight a ferrochrome plant.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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