A dairy revolution.

The people are going to have to lead on this one.

Editor’s note: This commentary is by Will Allen and Michael Colby. Allen is the co-founder of Cedar Circle Farm in East Thetford. Colby is a writer and sugarmaker in Walden. Both are co-founders, along with Kate Duesterberg, of Regeneration Vermont. This essay is excepted from the full report, “Failure to Regulate: Big Dairy & Water Pollution in Vermont.”

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Water

Why it’s legal to pump untreated canal water into Californians’ homes.

BRAWLEY, CALIFORNIA – It takes Humberto Lugo several minutes to explain how the home he is standing in front of actually gets its water. It’s a small, stucco house dwarfed by an expanse of dusty farm fields that sit mostly fallow in September, awaiting the next planting of winter vegetables.

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The perils of pesticide drift.

The Perils of Pesticide Drift

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Toxics

Ottawa ignoring hazards of top pesticides sold in Canada.

Ottawa ignoring hazards of top pesticides sold in Canada

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Toxics

No pesticides or herbicides found in Charleston or Mount Pleasant water.

No Pesticides Or Herbicides Found In Charleston Or Mount Pleasant Water

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Toxics

Report reveals contaminants in “legal” water.

An environmental group’s new report shows a broad range of contaminants occur in many drinking water systems in the Ohio Valley, even though the water meets federal requirements. The research highlights the gap between what regulations require and what many scientists and health advocates recommend for safe drinking water.

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Toxics

Has Ottawa sold out to Big Agro and its toxic chemicals.

The first of a two-part series

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Justice

Report reveals contaminants in 'legal' water.

An environmental group’s new report shows a broad range of contaminants occur in many drinking water systems in the Ohio Valley, even though the water meets federal requirements. The research highlights the gap between what regulations require and what many scientists and health advocates recommend for safe drinking water.

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Toxics

The Trump administration just punted on how to handle the most toxic pesticides.

Back in March, the Environmental Protection Agency abruptly reversed its own decision to ban a highly toxic insecticide called chlorpyrifos—an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is strongly suspected of hindering brain development in kids, even at tiny exposure levels. Turns out, the EPA wasn't done running interference for the chemical, a big seller for agrichemical giant Dow Agrosciences.

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Toxics

EPA mulls Dow, FMC requests to redo endangered species studies.

An EPA official appeared to welcome the opportunity to re-evaluate three contentious scientific assessments on pesticides that harm rare species, saying the agency wanted more time to finish the evaluations before fully considering outside recommendations.

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Food

Dow’s lobbying spending overshadows competition.

Dow’s Lobbying Spending Overshadows Competition

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Toxics

Alarms raised about herbicide runoff as planting season nears.

Over the next three months corn farmers around the state will begin applying one of the most common soil and surface-water contaminants in the United States, the herbicide atrazine, and environmental advocates say it will cause serious harm to Vermont’s aquatic life.

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Toxics

Big Agro on campus.

In early 2014, New Brunswick’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was facing a crisis. Rod Cumberland, former chief deer biologist for the province, had been waging a media and letter-writing campaign to draw attention to an unfolding disaster in the province’s forests—namely, the collapse of the white-tail deer population, which had dropped to 70,000 from a peak of 286,000 in 1985.

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Food

6 ways Trump's administration could literally make America more toxic.

In late March, chlorpyrifos, a pesticide commonly used to ward off insects on fruit and vegetable crops, was nearing the end of a decade-long review process. There's strong evidence suggesting that the insecticide inhibits kids' brain development, and at least 80,000 scientists, environmentalists, and members of the public had signed a petition urging the Environmental Protection Agency to ban the stuff outright. But in the final stages of review, EPA director Scott Pruitt greenlighted the chemical instead, arguing there was insufficient evidence to ban it. Now farmers can continue to apply it to crops like corn, strawberries, almonds, and tomatoes.

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Toxics

Sue, die or keep waiting.

John Burns could feel the spray on his body from a helicopter applying a mixture of pesticides to a nearby clearcut. He describes the well-publicized October 2013 incident as nothing less than an attack on himself and his property. 

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From our Newsroom

Bhopal nocturne

35 years after the chemical industry's worst accident, have we learned any lessons? A petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River suggests we haven't.

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