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$11.9M settlement reached over PFAS contamination in Parchment, MI drinking water

A $11. 9 million settlement was reached in a lawsuit filed over high levels of PFAS contamination in Parchment drinking water. Jesika Sage,Parchment resident, said her family of nine, like many others in Parchment, have been dealing with contaminated waters for years. “I think it’s a step in the right direction but how do you put a price tag on a community that’s been poisoned for years on end for profit," Sage said.
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www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Twitter is turning birds into celebrities and birders against one another

A Twitter account helped spread the word about rare birds in New York City, but publicizing their locations exposed a rift among birders.
www.mic.com
Climate

Shell asked Twitter how they will address climate change. Twitter told Shell to go screw itself

On Monday, seemingly on its high-horse and feeling like a world leader in environmental activism, Shell took to Twitter to ask others what exactly they plan to do to lower their emissions. The overwhelming sentiment of the response was, essentially, "lol, fuck off."

www.sfchronicle.com
Climate

Newsom calls for California to conserve land, coasts to capture carbon and fight climate change

Gov. Gavin Newsom said California will enlist its natural resources in the state’s fight against climate change by establishing new land conservation and carbon sequestration goals over the next decade.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Behavioral contagion could spread the benefits of a carbon tax

It’s not too late to fight climate change with a long-overdue policy that would have surprisingly broad impact, an economist says.
theconversation.com
Biodiversity

Twitter posts show that people are profoundly sad – and are visiting parks to cheer up

Research that measures the public mood based on Twitter posts shows that it's currently at its lowest point in a decade. One exception: when people visit parks and green spaces.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Misleading coronavirus video, pushed by the Trumps, spreads online

Social media companies took down the video within hours. But by then, it had already been viewed tens of millions of times.
www.sfchronicle.com

With coronavirus antibodies fading fast, vaccine hopes fade, too

Recent studies indicate that the human body does not retain the antibodies that build up when people are infected with the coronavirus, meaning there may be no lasting immunity to the virus, even with a vaccine.

www.sfchronicle.com
Climate

SF, other California cities permitted to sue oil industry over climate change, judge rules

Eight California cities and counties, including San Francisco and Oakland, want billions of dollars from fossil fuel companies, alleging they caused major climate problems, like rising seas and extreme weather.
www.sfchronicle.com
Toxics

California sues EPA for suspending pollution enforcement during coronavirus pandemic

California, along with eight other states, sued the EPA for suspending enforcement of air and water pollution monitoring and reporting during the coronavirus pandemic.
www.houstonchronicle.com
Toxics

Pollution returns to Houston, as coranavirus restrictions loosen

Houston's air pollution is returning to normal levels, following a period of cleaner skies during the stay-at-home orders put in place to slow the spread the coronavirus.

www.sfchronicle.com
Toxics

Recycling takes a hit in coronavirus California as plastic waste piles up

The coronavirus pandemic has set back efforts to combat plastic pollution, as environmentally conscious Bay Area residents are forced to abandon their good habits while efforts on the state level to reduce waste face uncertainty.
Biodiversity

Here we go again: Hopeful, fake animal news keeps spreading amid pandemic

Fake stories may seem like harmless fun—but in the long run, they undermine conservation efforts, scientists say.
www.houstonchronicle.com
Toxics

As pollution abates and skies clear, coronavirus shutdown gives glimpse of life with less fossil fuel

Whether it's blue skies over Beijing, satellite imagery showing emissions dropping in Milan or air monitors in Houston recording less ozone than normal, mankind's sudden hunkering down in response to the coronavirus pandemic has resulted in visibly cleaner air with remarkable speed.

Biodiversity

Coyotes are being seen on the empty streets of San Francisco

While families' cats and dogs are enjoying the upside of spending days with their owners working from home during the coronavirus shutdown, wild coyotes in San Francisco are reportedly also taking advantage of the benefits of a suddenly empty city.
From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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