www.nytimes.com

‘The City I Love’ and climate change: A Miami story

Also this week, who cleans up when oil and gas companies fail?
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www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Going ‘deep green,’ office buildings give back to the planet

As technology costs have declined, more developers are creating buildings that can benefit the Earth by tackling pollution and save money by producing their own power.

www.bloomberg.com
Toxics

Bay Area transit leaders push for a single network

With budget gaps fraying a large and fragmented public transportation system, transit voices in San Francisco and Oakland push for a single regional operator. 
www.northernpublicradio.org
Justice

'The wrong complexion for protection.' How race shaped America's roadways and cities

When the urban planner Robert Moses began building projects in New York during the 1920s, he bulldozed Black and Latino homes to make way for parks, and built highways through the middle of minority neighborhoods.

Toxics

This new car-free district in Shenzhen is the size of midtown Manhattan

As part of a new corporate headquarters for company Tencent, a new district in one of the densest cities in the world will barely allow any cars.
undark.org
Toxics

Amid a pandemic, transit authorities turn to technology

As COVID-19 rages on, cities are eyeing microtransit to create a responsive system. But experts say there are tradeoffs.

www.politico.com
Justice

Borrowed time: Climate change threatens U.S. mortgage market

"Everyone is exposed" as taxpayer-backed loans and insurance face a coming storm.
www.wired.com
Population

Want to fix urban sprawl? Ditch the cul-de-sac

Streets arranged in grids, with few dead-ends, encourage walking and transit. But in developing countries, growing cities are taking the opposite route.
www.wired.com
Justice

In the walking capitals of the world, drivers still rule the road

In sub-Saharan Africa, about half of travelers move around by foot. Yet in its cities, conditions for pedestrians remain incredibly dangerous.
thehill.com
Population

Joel Kotkin: The new geography of America, post-coronavirus

Nearly two in five urban residents are considering a move to a less crowded place.
www.theatlantic.com
Climate

Urban density is not the problem

despite ample evidence that urbanites live longer and healthier lives than their counterparts in rural areas, the spread of the coronavirus - and New York City's tragic experience in particular - has fueled a dubious association between population density and contagion.

Toxics

How will Americans commute after lockdowns end?

Will car traffic surge as lockdowns end, or will millions of Americans decide to bike, walk, or work from home permanently? Emerging research offers some hints.
www.nationalgeographic.com
Toxics

Your daily commute won't ever be the same

Coronavirus will upend—but perhaps make healthier—the ways we use trains, buses, and bike lanes in our post-pandemic future.
Toxics

A post-pandemic reality check for transit boosters

After lockdowns ease, public transportation ridership in the U.S. is likely to remain low for years. But some see a way forward for a new understanding of transit’s role.
From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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