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Toxics

Commentary: Scientific challenges in the risk assessment of food contact materials.

Scientific Challenges in the Risk Assessment of Food Contact Materials

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Toxics

What’s at stake in Trump’s proposed EPA cuts.

What is at stake as Congress considers the E.P.A. budget? Far more than climate change.

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Toxics

Workplace cancer prevention must be extended to reprotoxic substances.

Laurent Vogel is a researcher at the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI).

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Toxics

The trouble lies not in our sperm, poor Nick.

The New York Times’ Nicholas Kristof gives a misleading account of the threat from trace exposures to chemicals in the environment.

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Originals

Pregnant women’s sex hormones waver with phthalate exposure.

Women exposed to certain chemicals in flooring and food packaging early in pregnancy are more likely to have decreased free testosterone—hormones vital for fetal growth, according to a new study.

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Toxics

DEHP linked to hydrocele genital anomaly in newborns.

US epidemiological study highlights sensitive indicator of phthalate exposure

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Toxics

Commercial dog foods affect fertility and sexual development.

Commercial Dog Foods Affect Fertility and Sexual Development

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Toxics

Chemicals in food wrappings could harm human and dog fertility.

Chemicals found in plastic wrappings and the environment could be behind the drop in sperm counts, scientists have suggested, after discovering that dogs are also losing their fertility because they live alongside humans.

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Toxics

Study showing decline in dog fertility may have human implications.

26-year study of canine sperm shows an overall decline in quality, and may also shed light on fertility changes seen in male humans

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Toxics

Air pollutants blamed for rising birth defects in South Korea: Study.

The number of South Korean babies with birth defects has increased significantly since the early 1990s, likely due to traffic-related air pollutants and endocrine disruptors, a study showed Monday.

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From our Newsroom

Op-ed: PFAS chemicals—the other immune system threat

"This global pandemic is scary for everyone and it's even scarier knowing your family has been exposed to chemicals that may hurt the immune system."

Join the “Agents of Change” discussion on research and activism

Four of the fellows who participated in the program this year will discuss their ongoing research, activism, and experiences with publishing their ideas in the public sphere.

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

In an effort to bolster our health, we may be exposed to compounds that harm us. New research says physicians need to recognize and explain this hidden risk to patients.

A fracking giant's fall

Chesapeake Energy was a fracking pioneer on a meteoric rise. Last week, it fell to Earth.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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