stateimpact.npr.org

A new advisory panel on climate change starts work at DRBC

As Tropical Storm Isaias swept through last week, the Delaware River Basin Commission's newest committee was convening for the very first time. Its aim: to help inform water resource planning efforts regarding climate change.

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
civileats.com
Justice

US groups invest billions in industrial ag in Africa. Experts say it's not ending hunger or helping farmers

Two new reports shed light on how billions of dollars from public institutions and the Gates Foundation continue to flow to “Green Revolution” strategies despite claims of their failure.
Justice

India’s most recent cyclone highlights a worrying future

Storms are growing stronger as the planet warms. India must focus on an integrated approach after Cyclone Amphan, researchers say.
www.circleofblue.org
Justice

Climate change, pandemic, violence are volatile mix in Chad

A warming climate was already making life difficult in Chad, a landlocked country squeezed against the encroaching sands of the Sahara.

www.washingtonpost.com
Toxics

In Colorado’s climate change hot spot, the West’s water is evaporating

Post analysis found the largest part of the contiguous United States to warm more than 2 degrees Celsius since 1895 lies in Colorado and Utah.
www.circleofblue.org
Justice

Nine things to know about household water debt

Circle of Blue has compiled nine things you need to know about water debt in the United States.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

This is inequity at the boiling point

Earth is overheating. This year is poised to be one of the hottest ever. Millions are already feeling the pain, but the agony of extreme heat is profoundly unequal across the globe.
www.circleofblue.org
Justice

Millions of Americans are in water debt

Most Americans give little thought to water bills. But for a subset of homeowners and renters, water debt is constant and menacing.
www.reuters.com
Justice

U.S. court allows Dakota Access oil pipeline to stay open, but permit status unclear

A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday said that the Dakota Access Pipeline does not have to be shut and drained per a lower court order.

news.mongabay.com
Justice

More than 500 dams planned inside protected areas: Study

Hundreds of dams are planned within global protected areas, a prospect that threatens people, plants and animals that rely on the life-giving waters of free-flowing rivers.

www.circleofblue.org
Climate

Tensions rise in Horn of Africa as Ethiopia fills controversial dam

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, situated snuggly between Ethiopia, Egypt, and Sudan on the Blue Nile, has brought years of controversy to the Horn of Africa.
www.circleofblue.org
Toxics

When it rains, Texas forgets drought and worsening water scarcity

In Texas, dry years reveal a momentous confrontation as residents encounter the menacing consequence of runaway growth.
www.bbc.com
Justice

The wells bringing hope in the desert

At the encroaching edge of the Sahara Desert, community tensions are tightly bound up with the search for water.

www.circleofblue.org
Justice

Where water is scarce on Native American reservations, COVID-19 spreads more easily

For Indigenous people living across the United States, the Covid-19 pandemic is the newest chapter in a long history of fighting against disease.
Justice

Inside the uphill fight for clean water in California’s Central Valley

More than 1 million Californians, many of them living in the state's agricultural heartland, still do not have access to clean water.

From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.