Trump rule reversal expands protections for Montana waterways

Many of Montana's streams and wetlands lost Clean Water Act protections after the Trump administration passed a federal rule in 2020, but those pollution protections were restored following a recent decision by a U.S. district court judge.

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Toxics

EPA to add toxic Gloucester County metal finishing company site to Superfund list

The EPA is proposing to list a metal finishing company in Franklinville, Gloucester County, as a Superfund site.

Justice

In a Colombian wetland, oil woes deepen with the arrival of fracking

A century of oil extraction has failed to yield the promised social and economic dividends, while compromising local water resources.

thehill.com
Toxics

Researchers say firefly populations are dying out due to human development, pesticides

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Water

Forum explores reducing erosion, pollution by storing more water on landscape

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ohiovalleyresource.org
Toxics

Win for wetlands: Program helps farmers conserve more flood prone land

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www.latimes.com
Climate

Salt marshes will vanish in less than a century if seas keep rising and California keeps building, study finds

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www.miamiherald.com

Miami 'starchitects' under scrutiny for cutting protected mangroves. Again

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Climate

Trump’s sellout of American heritage.

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Beijing philanthropist commits $1.5 billion to conservation.

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Climate

Beyond biodiversity: A new way of looking at how species interconnect.

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Climate

Everyone knew Houston’s reservoirs would flood — except for the people who bought homes inside them.

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Water

'I am rather stuck': Justices slog through WOTUS arguments.

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From our Newsroom

Alabama PFAS manufacturing plant creates the climate pollution of 125,000 cars

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LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter featured on "We Can Be" podcast

"I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good."

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