Trump administration plan to allow drilling along the Atlantic coast has fallen apart

Opponents of the drilling declared victory on Thursday after the government acknowledged that permits to allow seismic blasting in the ocean will expire next month and not be renewed.
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Toxics

Does wildfire smoke harm whales and dolphins? Here’s what we know

As North America's West Coast burns, scientists are concerned marine mammals will be harmed by smoke inhalation, an unstudied phenomenon.
www.nytimes.com
Biodiversity

Hundreds of whales stranded off Tasmania

More than 450 pilot whales became stranded on the west coast of the island state in Australia. Rescuers estimate that over half of them have already died.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Orca that carried dead calf for 17 days gives birth again

Researchers spotted the killer whale they call J35 alongside her “robust and lively” new calf on Saturday — a ray of hope for the endangered Southern Resident population off the Pacific Northwest.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

What it took to free a whale entangled in 4,000 pounds of fishing gear

The influx of whales to cleaner waters off New York City has meant that the number of them injured or killed there is on the rise.
Justice

Baiting and abetting

Scientists have found dozens of marine mammals firmly tied to fish aggregators in Ecuador, suggesting fishers are using the animals as bait.

www.forbes.com
Climate

Will AI save us from ourselves?

Humans are wired to deal with immediate threats like that what's that moving in the bushes. However, for long-term threats like climate change, people suffer from cognitive biases that often make us discount the extent of the threat or turn us into bystanders as we wait for someone else to deal with the problem.

www.biographic.com
Biodiversity

Wanted alive

For the first time in decades, Icelandic whalers have stopped hunting fin whales, thanks in part to a growing appreciation for the value these mammals bring to both marine and human communities.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Northern right whales are on the brink, and Trump could be their last hope

The species was declared critically endangered on Thursday, with fewer than 450 left.
Climate

Pandemic offers scientists chance to ‘hear’ oceans without man-made noise

Last month, scientists cobbled together an array of 130 underwater hydrophone listening stations around the world to learn how marine animals are doing.
apnews.com
Biodiversity

Trump allows commercial fishing in marine conservation area

President Donald Trump rolled back protections Friday at a marine conservation area off the New England coast, signing an order to allow commercial fishing in a stretch of water environmentalists say is critical for endangered right whales and other fragile marine life.

nrdc.org
Biodiversity

Commercial whaling may be over in Iceland

Citing the pandemic, whale watching, and a lack of exports, one of the three largest whaling countries may be calling it quits.
Biodiversity

Iceland won't be killing any whales this year

For conservationists, this interruption to whaling, however long it lasts, is welcome news.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

The sound of one shrimp snapping

How climate change is altering nature’s sonic landscape.
www.nytimes.com
Toxics

A.I. is helping scientists understand an ocean's worth of data

Machine-learning applications are proving to be especially useful to the scientific community studying the planet’s largest bodies of water.
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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