Silent Spring researchers brief Barnstable on chemical exposure issues

Breast cancer rates on Cape Cod are 21 percent above the state average, Silent Sprint Institute researchers reminded a 150-member audience at Barnstable Town Hall Wednesday.

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Toxics

Pesticide residues linked to unsuccessful IVF

Women who ate more produce known to harbor pesticides were less likely to succeed with fertility treatment than women who ate fewer of these fruits and vegetables.
Glamour
Toxics

It's surprisingly hard to ban toxic sex toys, but here's how to protect yourself.

It's Surprisingly Hard to Ban Toxic Sex Toys, But Here's How to Protect Yourself

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Climate

Members of Congress want a federal audit of the official Puerto Rico death toll.

Two Democratic members of Congress on Thursday requested an audit of the death toll in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, amid concerns that the government is undercounting the number of victims.

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Toxics

Claims filing begins in WV water crisis settlement.

By Ken Ward Jr. Staff writer 10 hrs ago (0)

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Toxics

Canada groups urge government to toughen toxic chemicals law.

By Lynn Desjardins | english@rcinet.ca

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Water

Hurricane Maria death toll rises in Puerto Rico.

In our news wrap Tuesday, the confirmed death toll in Puerto Rico rose to 43 nearly three weeks after Hurricane Maria wrecked the island. Authorities blamed infections and bad road conditions, among other factors. Also, President Trump denied he was undercutting Secretary of State Tillerson, despite proposing to Forbes magazine they compare IQ tests after Tillerson reportedly called him a “moron.”

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TruckPR
Toxics

We can reduce breast cancer by reducing pollution.

Francis Koster: We can reduce breast cancer by reducing pollution

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Toxics

Test tube babies in a conflict zone: Dealing with infertility in Gaza.

The Gaza Strip was a month into this summer’s suffocating electricity crisis when Thair Salah Mortaja became a father for the first time. He had spent thousands of dollars to overcome infertility – first paying for drugs, then a futile operation, and finally for costly in vitro fertilisation (IVF) – but the struggle for parenthood did not end there.

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Toxics

Trading old hazards for new?

Industry and government officials say PFOA, the toxic chemical blamed for contaminating drinking water supplies in Hoosick Falls and several other area communities, is no longer used in manufacturing in the United States.

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Toxics

Workplace carcinogens lead to thousands of cancer cases in Ontario each year: Study.

Workplace exposure to carcinogens such as diesel exhaust, asbestos and silica are together causing thousands of cancer cases in Ontario each year, says a new study that reveals the toll of on-the-job hazardous substances.

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Col Hawksworth/flickr
Originals

Pollution and stress at home combine to spur more hyperactivity.

Breathing dirty air and living in stress combine to increase the likelihood NYC kids will have a behavior disorder.

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The Zika virus grew deadlier with a small mutation, study suggests.

It remains one of the great mysteries of the Zika epidemic: Why did a virus that existed for decades elsewhere in the world suddenly seem to become more destructive when it landed in Latin America?

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Toxics

Something in the water: Life after mercury poisoning.

Walking by the side of her house, Rimiko Yoshinaga points at the broad, vine-encrusted tree her grandfather used to climb. During one of the most famous environmental disasters in history, this tree stood over the calm, clear waters of the Shiranui Sea. He would perch up there and call down to say whether the fish were coming, Rimiko says.

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From our Newsroom

We’re dumping loads of retardant chemicals to fight wildfires. What does it mean for wildlife?

As western wildfires become bigger and more intense, state and federal fire agencies are using more and more aerial fire retardant, prompting concerns over fish kills, aquatic life, and water quality.

LISTEN: Why is it taking so long for Pennsylvania to regulate toxic chemicals in drinking water?

The chemicals, known as PFAS, are linked to health effects including cancer, thyroid disease, high cholesterol, pregnancy-induced hypertension, asthma, and ulcerative colitis.

Researchers, doctors call for regulators to reassess safety of taking acetaminophen during pregnancy

The painkiller, taken by half of pregnant women worldwide, could be contributing to rising rates of reproductive system problems and neurodevelopmental disorders like ADHD and autism.

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

LISTEN: Azmal Hossan on the sociology of climate crises in South Asia

"If we look at the rate of carbon emissions, most is emitted by the developed and industrialized countries, but the problem is poor countries like Bangladesh are the main sufferers."

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