www.nytimes.com

‘The coal industry is back,' Trump proclaimed. It wasn't

The demise of coal-fired power plants in Arizona and Kentucky shows how the president, despite promises to restore jobs, failed to counter the forces decimating the industry.
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Climate

A plan to mine the Minnesota wilderness hit a dead end. Then Trump became president.

The revival of project to mine the edge of Minnesota's cherished Boundary Water has angered environmentalists and focused attention on an unusual connection between a Chilean billionaire and President Trump's family.

www.eenews.net
Climate

Zinke was briefed by USGS chief before downplaying climate

The U.S. Geological Survey director huddled with Ryan Zinke hours before the then-Interior secretary went on television to downplay the National Climate Assessment.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Judge delivers major setback to Trump policy to increase coal mining on federal land

The Interior Department acted illegally when it sought to lift an Obama-era moratorium on coal mining on public lands, a court found.
abcnews.go.com
Toxics

Mining project on federal lands hires former Interior head

Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has a new job with a gold-mining firm that's pursuing project approvals involving the federal agency that Zinke left fewer than four months ago.

www.nytimes.com
Toxics

Interior nominee intervened to block report on endangered species

While serving as deputy secretary, David Bernhardt, President Trump’s choice to lead the Interior Department, adopted a regulatory approach favored by the pesticide industry.
www.washingtonpost.com
thehill.com
Climate

Adam Markham: Zinke’s successor needs to pick up the pieces and rebuild trust at Interior

The country needs a secretary who serves the public, not just the oil, gas and mining industries.
Climate

How Zinke lost his way

In journeying from Whitefish to Washington, an outsider from Montana failed to follow the political guardrails.
Credit: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Originals

Peter Dykstra: Year in review — Measuring the US government’s 2018 footprint ... on Mother Nature’s throat

The year saw President Donald Trump's promised multi-front assault on environmental values, regulations and science bear some toxic fruit.

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Climate

Leading contenders emerge to replace Zinke as Interior secretary

President Trump said he plans to announce this week his pick to replace Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who will be leaving the administration at the end of the year.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Ryan Zinke, Into the Sunset

The secretary of the Interior departs under a cascade of ethics investigations.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Zinke’s likely successor is a former oil Lobbyist who has influenced Trump’s energy policy

With the Interior secretary's departure, the agency will likely be run for a time by David Bernhardt, a man who has played a central role in opening up public lands to drilling and mining.
From our Newsroom

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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