Joshua Mayer

Strips of native prairie plants could reduce pollution runoff from farm fields.

A new study says small patches of native prairie plants provide a range of conservation benefits to Iowa’s landscape and could reduce water pollution from farm fields.

Strips Of Native Prairie Plants Could Reduce Pollution Runoff From Farm Fields

Keep reading... Show less
Agri-Pulse

Trump's nominee to be USDA's chief scientist is not a scientist.

The chief scientist of the U.S. Department of Agriculture is typically a low-profile job in any presidential administration. But President Trump's nomination of his former Iowa campaign manager for the post is raising concern in the scientific community and beyond about the politicization of science policy in the Trump administration.

Keep reading... Show less

How, and why, some farmers are bringing livestock back to the prairie.

On a cloudy summer day, Iowa farmer Wendy Johnson lifts the corner of a mobile chicken tractor, a lightweight mesh-covered plastic frame that has corralled her month-old meat chickens for a few days, and frees several dozen birds to peck the surrounding area at will. Soon, she'll sell these chickens to customers at local markets.

Keep reading... Show less

Eager to plant, corn belt farmers also wait on confirmation of new Ag Secretary.

Three months after his nomination, Sonny Perdue faces a confirmation vote in the U.S. Senate Monday for the post of secretary of agriculture.

Keep reading... Show less
Rich Herrmann/flickr

Study: Climate change may hurt nation's agricultural productivity.

The agriculture sector needs to ramp up its response to climate change, especially in the Midwest, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Keep reading... Show less

New federal rules for antibiotics on the farm may not reduce usage.

In a hog barn near Odebolt, veterinarian Paul Thomas's approach sends pigs scurrying. He watches for unusual behavior. As he walks the length of the barn, Thomas notices one of the two-month-old hogs nestled against the railing at the edge of its pen and reaches over to gently pet the pig's back. The pig shakes its head and drowsily gets up.

Keep reading... Show less

Absent regulations, farmers dabble in voluntary measures to stop harmful runoff.

On a gray day, just as the rain begins to fall, Roger Zylstra stops his red GMC Sierra pick-up truck on the side of the road and hops down into a ditch in Jasper County, Iowa. It takes two such stops before he unearths amid the tall weeds and grasses what he’s looking for.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Earth Day: Amidst the greenwashing, it's still a good thing

When corporations tout their greenness and journalists get beaten senseless by lame ideas.

‘Forever chemicals’ coat the outer layers of biodegradable straws

More evidence that harmful PFAS chemicals are sneaking into some "green" and "compostable" products.

Pesticide DDT linked to increased breast cancer risk generations after exposure

Groundbreaking study finds women whose grandmothers had high DDT exposure are more likely to be obese and have early menstruation—both breast cancer risk factors.

Want more clean energy? Focus on people, not technology

Energy decisions can be deeply personal. We need to listen to households and communities before we prescribe their energy transition.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

The political, media, and community response to our Fractured investigation

From a media blitz to calls for statewide drilling bans, here's a look at the fallout and impacts so far from EHN's investigation of western Pennsylvania fracking impacts.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.