Major oil and gas companies join program to cut methane emissions

62 oil and gas companies from around the world signed on to a UN-led partnership aimed at bolstering monitoring and reductions of the potent climate-warming gas.

Dozens of the top oil and gas companies in the world—including Shell, BP and Total—agreed this week to better track and reduce their methane emissions.

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Dead fish carry toxic mercury to the deep ocean, contaminating crustaceans

Fish carcasses sinking to the deepest parts of the ocean carry toxic mercury pollution that ends up contaminating bottom-dwelling sea creatures, according to a new study.

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Agents of Change: New fellows seek to reimagine science communication

We are excited to announce our second round of Agents of Change in Environmental Health fellows.

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Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to endocrine-disrupting compounds pass on health problems to future generations, including deformities, reduced survival, and reproductive problems, according to a new study.

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Solar power on the rise at US schools

When Mount Desert Island High School in Maine decided to use solar power, they turned to the students.

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Toxic pesticides and flame-retardants found in monkey, baboon, and chimpanzee poop

Baboons in the U.S., howler monkeys in Costa Rica, and baboons, chimpanzees, red-tailed monkeys, and red colobus in Uganda are all getting exposed to dangerous pesticides and flame-retardant chemicals, according to new research.

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Hot roads and roofs send harmful pollution into the air

We all know cars and trucks spew pollution into the air—but it turns out what's underneath their tires do as well.

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Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

Natural habitats across the planet that humans have converted to farms, cities or suburbs are much more likely to harbor wildlife that carry parasites or pathogens such as the novel coronavirus than undisturbed areas, according to a new study.

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From our Newsroom

Two things to be thankful for...

2020 is almost gone. And we are lucky to have prescient environmental reporters.

Q&A: A young environmental justice leader on the value of getting youth of color into nature

"Before decisions are made we need to practice what we preach when we say that we stand for justice and equity. In any decision-making process, youth need to be involved from the get-go."

10 tips for cleaner grocery shopping

Picking ingredients for a better lifestyle.

How to shop for cleaning products - while avoiding toxics

A simple, 4-step guide to decoding all that packaging.

No place is safe: Tiny bit of plastic pollute the snow, streams on iconic Mount Everest

"No one had ever looked at microplastics on Everest before—the scary thing is we found microplastic in every single snow sample that we took."

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