Moving forward after four years of fights and falsehoods

As the US turns the page on a skeptical and openly hostile administration, environmental science and journalism face continued obstacles—but there is some optimism.

What the hell just happened?

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Dirty air and lost pregnancies in South Asia

More than 349,000 lost pregnancies each year in South Asia are linked to excessive air pollution, according to a new study in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.

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Major oil and gas companies join program to cut methane emissions

Dozens of the top oil and gas companies in the world—including Shell, BP and Total—agreed this week to better track and reduce their methane emissions.

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Dead fish carry toxic mercury to the deep ocean, contaminating crustaceans

Fish carcasses sinking to the deepest parts of the ocean carry toxic mercury pollution that ends up contaminating bottom-dwelling sea creatures, according to a new study.

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Agents of Change: New fellows seek to reimagine science communication

We are excited to announce our second round of Agents of Change in Environmental Health fellows.

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Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to endocrine-disrupting compounds pass on health problems to future generations, including deformities, reduced survival, and reproductive problems, according to a new study.

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Solar power on the rise at US schools

When Mount Desert Island High School in Maine decided to use solar power, they turned to the students.

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Toxic pesticides and flame-retardants found in monkey, baboon, and chimpanzee poop

Baboons in the U.S., howler monkeys in Costa Rica, and baboons, chimpanzees, red-tailed monkeys, and red colobus in Uganda are all getting exposed to dangerous pesticides and flame-retardant chemicals, according to new research.

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From our Newsroom

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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