Credit: Nicholas D./flickr

Latest round of vinyl floor tests come up phthalate-free

Success! After a national report found worrisome plastic additives widespread in vinyl flooring, stores vowed to eliminate them. It appears they did, according follow-up tests.

Four years after environmental and health advocacy groups reported harmful phthalates in vinyl flooring sold at popular stores, recent tests show the pressure to remove these hormone disrupting compounds worked.

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Mo catching up on some reading. (Credit: Brian Bienkowski)

Welcome our hardworking interns — and, hey, whatcha reading?

Summer is upon us — and things are heating up at EHN.

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Vape flavors can hurt your heart

The flavors used in e-cigarettes—especially menthol and cinnamon—damage blood vessel cells and such impacts increase heart disease risk, according to a new study.

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Global electricity access grows—but we're not on track for 2030 sustainable energy goals

More people on the planet have access to electricity than ever before, however, the world is on pace to fall short on the goal of affordable and sustainable energy for all by 2030, according to an international report on the state of international energy.

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Credit: Bo Eide/flickr

From making it to managing it, plastic is a major contributor to climate change

Plastic is polluting oceans, freshwater lakes and rivers, food and us — but it's also a major contributor to global climate change, warns a new report.

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Credit: Cédric Dhaenens/Unsplash

The planet is losing free-flowing rivers. This is a problem.

Only 37 percent of the world's longest rivers remain unimpeded and free-flowing from their source to where they empty, according to a study published today in Nature.

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Credit: Ferris842/Wikimedia

Pesticides are all over the St. Lawrence River — many at levels that hurt fish and invertebrates

Harmful pesticides such as glyphosate, atrazine and neonicotinoids were found in nearly all samples of water from the St. Lawrence River and its tributaries, with many samples containing levels higher than the guideline to protect aquatic life, according to new research.

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