Credit: Randi Boice/flickr

US drinking water pollution could cause 100,000 cancer cases

New study says low levels of carcinogens may have a huge impact on our health

Contaminated drinking water—most of which currently meets legal quality standards—could cause an estimated 100,000 cancer cases in the U.S., according to a new report.

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White-crowned sparrow (Credit: Pete Myers)

Common insecticide threatens survival of wild, migrating birds

Migrating songbirds exposed to small amounts of a neonicotinoid pesticide suffered weight loss and migration delays, both of which could reduce their chances of survival, according to a new study.

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Global renewable energy has quadrupled over past decade

Renewable energy capacity quadrupled across the planet over the past decade and energy from solar power increased 26 times from what it was in 2009, according to an international report released today.

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Denmark to ban PFAS in food packaging

Denmark will ban the use of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in paper and cardboard used in food packaging within the next year under a proposal from the country's Ministry of Environment and Food.

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Secondhand vape exposure on the rise for kids, teens

Middle school kids and high school teens are increasingly breathing in secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes, according to a new study.

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People breathing dirty air more likely to have mental health problems

People exposed to high levels of air pollution have much greater odds of suffering from a psychiatric illness such as depression, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, according to a new study.

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NY seeks to be first state requiring ingredient labeling on menstrual products

A New York bill passed this summer would require labeling on menstrual products that lists the ingredients so women can avoid potential toxic exposure.

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Surprise! Unexpected ocean heat waves are becoming the norm

Ocean heat waves, which can push out fish, plankton and other aquatic life, are happening far more frequently than previously thought, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Peter Dykstra: The O.G.’s of E.J.

Covering Climate Now is an admirable, much-needed effort putting our planet front and center—but let's not overlook decades of strong journalism from the beat's pioneers.

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