(Credit: Petras Gagilas/flickr)

Federal tests 'dramatically' undercount BPA and other chemical exposures

Researchers say federal agencies use highly inaccurate tests to estimate exposure to BPA—findings that extend to multiple other harmful chemicals that get into our bodies

Tests used by the federal government to determine how much of the chemical bisphenol A is in people's bodies have "dramatically underestimated" our exposure, according to an analysis published today.

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Credit: Andre Hunter/Unsplash

Giving thanks and spreading good news

My wife and I escaped to a remote cabin a few weeks ago. We already live in the remote North and this took us further off grid, into the Wi-Fi-less woods.

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Humvees from the 407th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron at nearby Tallil Air Base patrol in the desert in 2005. (Credit: U.S. Air Forces/Master Sgt. Maurice Hessel)

Is the toxic legacy of the Iraq War deforming children near US bases?

Iraqi children living near a U.S. army base have elevated levels of dangerous metals in their bodies and are more likely to suffer from birth defects, according to a new study.

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Clouded in Clarity: A comic on chemicals & controversy

Harmful chemicals are difficult to understand. So, to pair with our investigation, "Exposed" we present EHN's first comic, "Clouded in Clarity," which focuses on BPA and the controversy around an ongoing, massive study on it.

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The Tatanka Wind Farm on the border in both North and South Dakota. (Credit: USFWS)

Renewables could be a health boon for Great Lakes, Upper Midwest regions

Installing more wind turbines in the Upper Midwest, and more solar panels in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions, would bring the largest health gains and benefits from U.S. renewable energy, according to a new Harvard University analysis.

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St. Bernard Public Housing Development. New Orleans, LA, 2007. (Credit: Subculture Photography/flickr)

Reduced lead trends in New Orleans soil and kids suggest prevention should expand outside the home

While tainted water and flaking paint remain a problem nationwide, decreasing levels of toxic lead in dirt is an important factor in reducing kids' exposure, according to a new study out of New Orleans.

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Credit: Lynn Friedman/flickr

Is air pollution worsening kids’ mental health?

Children exposed to high amounts of air pollution were more likely to end up in the emergency room for a mental health problem a couple days later than children with lower exposure, according to a new study.

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Credit: Randi Boice/flickr

US drinking water pollution could cause 100,000 cancer cases

Contaminated drinking water—most of which currently meets legal quality standards—could cause an estimated 100,000 cancer cases in the U.S., according to a new report.

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