Worrying new research finds that the ocean is cutting through a key Antarctic ice shelf.

The Dotson ice shelf holds back two large glaciers and connects to the larger West Antarctic ice sheet.

A new scientific study published Tuesday has found that warm ocean water is carving an enormous channel into the underside of one of the key floating ice shelves of West Antarctica, the most vulnerable sector of the enormous ice continent.

Keep reading... Show less

New EPA document reveals sharply lower estimate of the cost of climate change.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday released a detailed 198-page proposed analysis of the costs and benefits of its move to repeal the Clean Power Plan, suggesting the administration plans to greatly decrease the government’s estimates of the cost of climate change.

Keep reading... Show less

There’s enough wind energy over the oceans to power human civilization, scientists say.

New research published on Monday finds there is so much wind energy potential over oceans that it could theoretically be used to generate “civilization scale power” — assuming, that is, that we are willing to cover enormous stretches of the sea with turbines, and can come up with ways to install and maintain them in often extreme ocean environments.

Keep reading... Show less

Scientists mapping Greenland have produced some surprising – and worrying – results.

Greenland, the world’s largest island and home to its second largest ice sheet, is a land of ragged cliffs, breathtaking fjords and unimaginable amounts of water on either side of the freezing point. It has also, until now, been something of a mystery.

Keep reading... Show less

Scientists may have found a solution to the atmosphere’s methane mystery.

When it comes to climate change, we know where the most important warming agent — carbon dioxide — is coming from. Most of it is coming from the burning of fossil fuels, with additional contributions from deforestation and other causes.

Keep reading... Show less

Severe power failures in Puerto Rico and across the Caribbean spur new interest in renewables.

The ongoing electricity disaster in Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria — and on several other Caribbean islands slammed at full force by strong storms — is driving new interest in ways of shifting island power grids toward greater reliance on wind, solar and even, someday, large batteries.

Keep reading... Show less

The scariest thing about this year’s hurricanes: They keep getting really strong, really fast.

The scariest thing about this year’s hurricanes: They keep getting really strong, really fast

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

The pollution plumes of North Pole

An oil refining chemical has infiltrated the water of a small Alaskan town, but families—many worried about health issues—are left with more questions than answers.

Systemic racism continues to plague pandemic response: Derrick Z. Jackson

Remembering those have fallen to the collective selfishness of the prior White House and the nation's governors—a selfishness significantly stained by systemic racism.

Earth Day: Amidst the greenwashing, it's still a good thing

When corporations tout their greenness and journalists get beaten senseless by lame ideas.

‘Forever chemicals’ coat the outer layers of biodegradable straws

More evidence that harmful PFAS chemicals are sneaking into some "green" and "compostable" products.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Pesticide DDT linked to increased breast cancer risk generations after exposure

Groundbreaking study finds women whose grandmothers had high DDT exposure are more likely to be obese and have early menstruation—both breast cancer risk factors.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.