Emily Collins, executive director of Fair Shake Environmental Legal Services, on the bank of the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh. (Credit: Jay Manning/PublicSource)

Could the Ohio River have rights? A movement to grant rights to the environment tests the power of local control

"What you're seeing is not just a legal strategy, it's an organizing strategy. It's a seismic shift in thinking about nature that has to happen."

Can you imagine if the Ohio River and its tributaries had legal rights? While speculative, the idea isn't necessarily far-fetched.

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