BBC World Service

How an activist minister in Philippines took on the mining barons.

Gina Lopez, who served as the Philippines’ environment chief, talks about her embattled, short-lived tenure and explains why it’s so difficult to rein in the country’s powerful and environmentally destructive mining industry.

BY FRED PEARCE • OCTOBER 5, 2017

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In a stunning turnaround, Britain moves to end the burning of coal.

In a Stunning Turnaround, Britain Moves to End the Burning of Coal

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Thirty years after the Montreal Protocol, solving the ozone problem remains elusive.

Despite a ban on chemicals like chlorofluorocarbons, the ozone hole over Antarctica remains nearly as large as it did when the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987. Scientists now warn of new threats to the ozone layer, including widespread use of ozone-eating chemicals not covered by the treaty.

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With the US out of Paris, what is the future for global climate fight?

World leaders insist President Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris agreement will not deter other nations from carrying out their commitments. But the departure of America creates new challenges for global efforts to tackle climate change.

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Industry meltdown: Is the era of nuclear power coming to an end?

Is the nuclear power industry in its death throes?  Even some nuclear enthusiasts believe so. With the exception of China, most nations are moving away from nuclear — existing power plants across the United States are being shut early; new reactor designs are falling foul of regulators, and public support remains in free fall. Now come the bankruptcies.

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From our Newsroom

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

A new study found levels of the widespread herbicide and its breakdown products reduced, on average, more than 70 percent in both adults and children after just six days of eating organic.

Stranded whales and dolphins offer a snapshot of ocean contamination

"Many of the chemical profiles that we see in cetaceans are similar to the types of chemical profiles that we see in humans who live in those coastal areas."

Cutting forests and disturbing natural habitats increases our risk of wildlife diseases

A new study found that animals known to carry harmful diseases such as the novel coronavirus are more common in landscapes intensively used by people.

The President’s green comedy routine

A token, triumphal green moment for a president and party who just might need such a thing in an election year.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

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