Grace van Deelen

Obesity environmental chemicals
Credit: Pixabay

Doctors advocate for treating obesity as an environmental problem

Doctors are beginning to incorporate obesogen science into their treatment of patients, but face barriers to making the practice widespread.

When Dr. Rob Sargis sees a patient struggling with obesity, his recommendations go beyond diet and exercise. He may advise them to stop heating things in plastics, or to avoid congested roads during rush hour.

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Using comedy to combat climate change

A car pulls up to a street corner, and a young, bearded man hops in the passenger seat, only to come face to face with a weathered and bald future version of himself.

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ski wax PFAS

Workers exposed to PFAS in a variety of industries

For the better part of 20 years, Peter Arlein worked as a professional ski technician, waxing skis across Colorado.

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Children PFAS

“Green” children's products not always PFAS-free, warns new study

PFAS are finding their way into “green” and “nontoxic” products, especially waterproof products marketed toward children and adolescents, according to new research.

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obesity

Chemicals in everyday products are spurring obesity, warns a new review

Many years ago, endocrinologist and medical doctor Robert Lustig had a patient, a 5-year-old girl, who was suffering from obesity. Unable to determine the cause of her obesity, Lustig scanned her for tumors.

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PFAS ban

New Washington state bill is the “fastest timeline in the nation” for phasing out PFAS

A new Washington state bill, signed into law last Thursday by Gov. Jay Inslee, aims to phase out PFAS in select consumer products by 2025.

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mental health kids

Ozone linked to depression in adolescents

Ozone, a common air pollutant, could be one of the causes behind depressive symptoms in adolescents, according to a new study.

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PFAS in air

PFAS are leaving a chemical fingerprint in pine needles

Pine trees are tracking airborne chemicals, according to new research.

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From our Newsroom
The Monongahela river in Pittsburgh

Chemicals linked to birth defects are being dumped in Pittsburgh’s rivers: Report

Chemicals linked to cancer and developmental harm are also released in large quantities into the city’s three rivers.

Hurricane Ian climate change damage

Peter Dykstra: With Ian, treat climate like an 'active shooter'

And let’s treat climate deniers as accomplices.

Chemical recycling grows  along with concerns of its impacts

Chemical recycling grows — along with concerns about its environmental impacts

Industry says chemical recycling could solve the plastic waste crisis, but environmental advocates and some lawmakers are skeptical.

Failure of the universities: The culture gap is now near lethal

Universities are failing us

Our educational systems are failing to prepare people for existential environmental threats

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

Peter Dykstra: The good news that gets buried by the bad

Peter Dykstra: The good news that gets buried by the bad

On the environment beat, maybe it’s right that the bad news dominates. But the good news is out there, too.