Grace van Deelen

ski wax PFAS

Workers exposed to PFAS in a variety of industries

From construction to skiing, PFAS are an important, but understudied, source of on-the-job chemical exposure.

For the better part of 20 years, Peter Arlein worked as a professional ski technician, waxing skis across Colorado.

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Children PFAS

“Green” children's products not always PFAS-free, warns new study

PFAS are finding their way into “green” and “nontoxic” products, especially waterproof products marketed toward children and adolescents, according to new research.

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obesity

Chemicals in everyday products are spurring obesity, warns a new review

Many years ago, endocrinologist and medical doctor Robert Lustig had a patient, a 5-year-old girl, who was suffering from obesity. Unable to determine the cause of her obesity, Lustig scanned her for tumors.

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PFAS ban

New Washington state bill is the “fastest timeline in the nation” for phasing out PFAS

A new Washington state bill, signed into law last Thursday by Gov. Jay Inslee, aims to phase out PFAS in select consumer products by 2025.

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mental health kids

Ozone linked to depression in adolescents

Ozone, a common air pollutant, could be one of the causes behind depressive symptoms in adolescents, according to a new study.

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PFAS in air

PFAS are leaving a chemical fingerprint in pine needles

Pine trees are tracking airborne chemicals, according to new research.

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PFAS food

Unintentional PFAS in products: A “jungle” of contamination

Toxic PFAS are often added into consumer products to make items stain- or water-resistant. But mounting evidence indicates that many products made without the intentional addition of PFAS are also contaminated.

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fish endocrine disruption

Together, toxics and climate change hinder fish growth

In biology, there is a rule of thumb that upholds food webs: the 10% rule, meaning animals are generally good at converting energy from their food into body weight at a rate of about 10%.

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From our Newsroom
solar power schools

Solar power at Pennsylvania schools doubled during the pandemic

“If this growth continues, schools could set Pennsylvania up as a clean energy leader and not just the fossil fuels we’re known for.”

obesity

Op-Ed: The medical community is missing a major piece of the obesity puzzle

Health care practitioners and regulators need to address the chemicals in everyday products that are in part spurring the obesity crisis.

environmental justice

LISTEN: Black histories and visions of urban planning

We need to center "lived experience and desire in a way that our existing frameworks don't allow for."

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

1872 mining law

Peter Dykstra: The steal of the last century and a half

The General Mining Law of 1872 turned 150 this month. It hasn’t changed a bit.

environmental justice

Op-Ed: Black gold and the color line

How historical racist redlining practices are linked to higher exposures to oil and gas wells.

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