Old age, neglect and a changing climate are rendering US dams dangerous

In the face of more frequent and intense rainfall, dam failures are becoming the norm. What can be done with the underfunded relics?

Annapolis, Md.—DJ Buckley spent most of his afternoon on Aug. 3 picking up branches and debris out of the Annapolis Harbor.

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Credit: Jerry Lai/flickr

DDT linked to an increase in autism risk in new study

The discontinued pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of autism, according to a new study out of Columbia University Medical Center.

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Ruin Raider/flickr

Hidden studies from decades ago could have curbed PFAS problem: Scientist

An editorial published in Environmental Health today suggests that research on perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFAS) and their dangerous health effects was not revealed until several decades after it was conducted.

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Biologists measure, number and tag freshwater mussels from Deer Creek at Rocks State Park to reintroduce the species to the Patapsco River. (Credit: Maryland DNR)

Bringing back natural water filters in Maryland and beyond

ELLICOTT CITY, Md.—Under the waters of the Patapsco River in Maryland, new life is forming.

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Credit: Heather Mongilio/EHN

Fishermen disregard New Bedford Harbor’s lingering toxic past

NEW BEDFORD, Mass.—It was about 4:30 p.m. on a Friday, and Arthur Burton was standing on a pier by Fort Tabor in New Bedford, Massachusetts, with a fishing pole.

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Hot temperatures may be bad for brains, even young and healthy ones: Study

A new study out of Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that high temperatures are linked to cognitive impairments, even in resilient populations.

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More earthquakes, more anxiety in Oklahoma

If researcher Joan Casey pulled Oklahoma Google search data for the month of June, she would expect to see an increase in searches for anxiety. That's because on June 15, a magnitude 4 earthquake hit Oklahoma.

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Fracking may alter fat cells: Study

Chemicals released by fracking may increase the size and amount of fat cells, even at low concentrations often released into the environment, according to a new study released today.

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From our Newsroom

Fractured: Buffered from fracking but still battling pollution

A statewide network of fracking and conventional wells, pipelines, and petrochemical plants closes in on communities.

Fractured: Distrustful of frackers, abandoned by regulators

"I was a total cheerleader for this industry at the beginning. Now I just want to make sure no one else makes the same mistake I did. It has ruined my life."

Fractured: The stress of being surrounded

Jane Worthington moved her grandkids to protect them from oil and gas wells—but it didn't work. In US fracking communities, the industry's pervasiveness causes social strain and mental health problems.

Fractured: Harmful chemicals and unknowns haunt Pennsylvanians surrounded by fracking

We tested families in fracking country for harmful chemicals and revealed unexplained exposures, sick children, and a family's "dream life" upended.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

LISTEN: Kristina Marusic discusses the "Fractured" investigation

"Once they had the results of our study [families] felt like they had proof that these chemicals are in their air, their water, and making their way into their bodies."

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