Huanjia Zhang

BPA replacement linked to increased cardiovascular disease

BPA replacement linked to increased cardiovascular disease

“It's not surprising that chemicals that are structurally similar to BPA are going to have similar effects on human populations.”

Bisphenol-S (BPS), a replacement chemical for bisphenol-A (BPA), may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the U.S. population, according to a new study published earlier this month in Environmental Sciences Europe.

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New York City apartments lead

Stirring up lead dust in NYC housing

NEW YORK—On a crisp Thursday afternoon in October, the 300 block of East 12th Street in Manhattan’s East Village became loud.

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organic fertilizer

“Organic” fertilizers have an inorganic problem

When Kegan Hilaire sent his mother, Maureen Hilaire, to get worm-poop fertilizer for their backyard garden in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, last March, one shopping trip turned into two, one online research session followed by another.

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pollution climate mental health

The emerging field of pollution and mental health research

Mounting scientific evidence reveals that environmental pollution and the stress of climate change not only anguish our physical health, but also impact our mental health.

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Phthalates’ regulatory standards may not protect people’s health, new study

Phthalates’ regulatory standards may not protect people’s health, new study

"Safe" limits on human exposure to phthalates set by national and international regulatory authorities may not adequately protect public health, according to a new analysis published in the journal Environmental Health on Monday.

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drinking water pollution

New database shows hundreds of contaminants detected in US tap water

Since 2019, more than 320 toxic substances have been detected in U.S. drinking water systems, according to a new analysis by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit environmental advocacy organization.

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africa cookstove

Fuel price spikes, pandemic recovery may push clean cooking goals out of reach: Study

Every year, 3.8 million people lose their lives to illness from household air pollution caused by cooking with unclean fuels such as wood, charcoal, coal, animal dung, and crop waste, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

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Mientras un gran número de demandantes buscan una compensación por el cáncer causado por el Roundup, los trabajadores agrícolas migrantes son dejados de lado

Mientras un gran número de demandantes buscan una compensación por el cáncer causado por el Roundup, los trabajadores agrícolas migrantes son dejados de lado

En el 2018, un encargado del mantenimiento de jardinería de una escuela de California llevó a la Compañía Monsanto a los tribunales, alegando que Roundup, uno de los herbicidas más populares de Estados Unidos, le causó un cáncer de linfoma no Hodgkin.
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From our Newsroom
Peter Dykstra: The good news that gets buried by the bad

Peter Dykstra: The good news that gets buried by the bad

On the environment beat, maybe it’s right that the bad news dominates. But the good news is out there, too.

environmental justice

LISTEN: Ashley Gripper on growing food to fight systemic oppression

“They never felt more resilient, more confident, more grounded in terms of their mental health, than they did when they were growing food.”

Shell's new petrochemical complex in southwestern Pennsylvania

The Titans of Plastic

Pennsylvania becomes the newest sacrifice zone for America’s plastic addiction.

Prince Charles speaking at the 2015 United Nation Climate Change Conference - COP21 (Paris, Le Bourget)

Peter Dykstra: Does climate action need a king?

Tradition could silence Charles III’s passionate voice on climate change. But should it?

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

Louisiana plastics plant shot down by judge

Louisiana plastics plant shot down by judge

Environmental justice comes for residents of Welcome, La., a community with a 99 percent minority population.