Anglers at the Falls of the Ohio State Park. (Credit: William Alden/flickr)

Whose job is it to reduce toxic mercury in the Ohio River?

The brain-harming metal is discharged directly into the river and carried to it on air currents. Some argue authorities are doing too little to stop both routes of pollution.

Mercury, which damages young brains, is flowing through industrial wastewater into the Ohio River. But the multi-state agency tasked with keeping the waterway clean hasn't tightened controls on this pollution because it doesn't have the authority to do so.

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Fighting pollution and apathy on the Lower Ohio

NEW ALBANY, Ind. — When Jason Flickner was a kid, he built a dam on the creek behind his grandparents' house causing it to flood a neighbor's basement.

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Trump administration’s regulatory rollback playing out at Indiana coal plant.

An Indiana utility will delay its plan to install top-of-the-line wastewater pollution controls at its largest coal plant as the U.S. EPA reconsiders the federal Obama-era rule that prompted the upgrades.

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Daniel Axler

Respect the elderly: Saving cities’ oldest trees.

INDIANAPOLIS—Jeff Stant was nervous. He passed easily through the undergrowth and spring pools of an unlikely old growth forest standing five miles from downtown Indianapolis, but he was looking out for contractors working for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Indiana pursuing coal retirements despite uncertainty over federal energy policy.

Indiana coal advocates hope President-elect Donald Trump’s anti-regulation stance will bring a competitive boost to their beleaguered industry. But the state’s utilities have shown they’ll continue moving away from coal, driven by the low price of natural gas and the costs of meeting pollution regulations that won’t be easy to roll back.

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From our Newsroom

How environmental justice work takes a toll on people of color

From discrimination and a lack of staff diversity to witnessing communities like yours harmed, environmental justice work is an emotional and physical struggle.

Air pollution can alter our brains in ways that increase mental illness risk

Emerging research finds polluted air linked to mental health problems, leaving western Pennsylvania children and environmental justice communities at high risk.

Feeling anxious about climate change? Experts say you're not alone

Research shows more people are feeling anxious about the climate crisis and their numbers will only increase in the coming years. Experts are concerned it's taking a toll on mental health.

How contaminated water contributes to mental illness

New research indicates that childhood lead exposure impacts adult mental health. The toxic heavy metal is found across western Pennsylvania drinking water systems, leaving thousands of kids at risk.

Pollution’s mental toll: How air, water and climate pollution shape our mental health

For years Americans have been warned about the dangers of pollution and climate change but one effect is neglected: impacts to our brains.

LISTEN: Lariah Edwards on hormone-altering chemicals

"These levels that we craft policy on and then hold industry or a company accountable for … these levels we don't think are low enough. And that is a problem."

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