Vandenberg, Trasande, Sargis: Understanding endocrine disruptors

New video resources from endocrinologists will make it easier for medical professionals and patients to join ongoing conversations about this important class of chemicals

We all want to live longer, healthier lives. We wish this, not only for ourselves, but for our children and grandchildren, too.

Keep reading... Show less
Credit: Audrey_sel/flickr

Op-ed: Thinking through the EPA’s commitment to eliminate the use of mammals in toxicity testing

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency moves to get rid of research and testing in mammals (rats and mice), we are concerned the environmental impacts on human health—especially our children—will become worse.

Keep reading... Show less
(Credit: raw pixel/Unsplash)

Laura N. Vandenberg: It’s time to talk about cancer prevention — and the role of the environment

In his 2019 State of the Union address on Tuesday night, President Trump called for $500 million over the next 10 years to fund research on childhood cancers.

Keep reading... Show less
Alex Smith/flickr

25 years of endocrine disruptor research – great strides, but still a long way to go.

Cancer. Diabetes. Autism. Infertility. ADHD. Asthma. As the rates of these diseases increase over time, the public and researchers alike have focused on the role the environment might play in their cause and progression. Scientists in the field of environmental health sciences are not satisfied just to know that the environment contributes to human disease – they want to know how.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

And now, everything the country is not talking about ...

And here's at least one thing to do about it all.

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.