PFAS-free firefighting foams: Are they safer?

A small-scale certification effort could offer a path forward.

In the 1960s, researchers from the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory began testing a new class of firefighting foam that could rapidly extinguish fuel fires.

Keep reading... Show less
Mosquito larvae (Credit: Darron Birgenheier/flickr)

What’s the world’s most widely used herbicide doing to tiny critters?

As the active ingredient in Bayer's Roundup herbicide is increasingly scrutinized for human health impacts, scientists say it also could be altering the wildlife and organisms at the base of the food chain.

Keep reading... Show less
Credit: cpurl/flickr

Insecticide linked to increased breast cancer risk — 40 years after exposure

Melinda Lewis remembers splashing in the irrigation canals that outlined her grandpa's walnut and almond groves in the late 1960s.

Keep reading... Show less
Residents fill up during the Cape Town water crisis in May. (Credit: Widad Sirkhotte/flickr)

Capturing and reusing urban storm water could be a boon for water-stressed cities—if we can find a way to clean it up

In March, residents of Cape Town, South Africa stood in line for hours to buy drinking water at supermarkets or pump it from springs amid severe water shortages.

Keep reading... Show less

Swine workers on front lines in fight against antibiotic resistance

As doctors in the Netherlands prepared a young girl for open heart surgery in the summer of 2004, they made a discovery that confused her medical team.

Keep reading... Show less

Location is everything: Pollutants in yellowfin tuna depend on where it’s caught.

Fish is a highly nutritious food, but it can also be a dietary source of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).1 In a new study in EHP, researchers investigated the extent to which contaminant levels within a single commercially important fish species varied depending on where the fish was caught.2 Their results suggest that capture location may be an important yet overlooked variable when assessing the risk of exposure to POPs from eating wild fish.

Keep reading... Show less

We can no longer outrun antibiotic resistance. Here’s what we need to do.

WE CAN NO LONGER OUTRUN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE. SO, HERE’S WHAT WE NEED TO DO INSTEAD.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

They blinded us with SCIENCE!

From climate change to COVID-19, even the clearest warnings from scientists can misfire with millions of Americans. Pop culture may be a big reason why.

Coronavirus, the environment, and you

How the spread of the deadly virus is impacted by climate change, the environment, and our lifestyles.

Fracking linked to rare birth defect in horses: Study

The implications for human health are "worrisome," say researchers.

Cutting edge of science

An exclusive look at important research just over the horizon that promises to impact our health and the environment

Reevaluating fish consumption advisories during the COVID-19 pandemic: Analysis

Our current crisis reaffirms the importance of weighing the health benefits of eating fish against chemical exposure risks.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.