PFAS-free firefighting foams: Are they safer?

A small-scale certification effort could offer a path forward.

In the 1960s, researchers from the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory began testing a new class of firefighting foam that could rapidly extinguish fuel fires.

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Mosquito larvae (Credit: Darron Birgenheier/flickr)

What’s the world’s most widely used herbicide doing to tiny critters?

As the active ingredient in Bayer's Roundup herbicide is increasingly scrutinized for human health impacts, scientists say it also could be altering the wildlife and organisms at the base of the food chain.

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Credit: cpurl/flickr

Insecticide linked to increased breast cancer risk — 40 years after exposure

Melinda Lewis remembers splashing in the irrigation canals that outlined her grandpa's walnut and almond groves in the late 1960s.

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Residents fill up during the Cape Town water crisis in May. (Credit: Widad Sirkhotte/flickr)

Capturing and reusing urban storm water could be a boon for water-stressed cities—if we can find a way to clean it up

In March, residents of Cape Town, South Africa stood in line for hours to buy drinking water at supermarkets or pump it from springs amid severe water shortages.

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Swine workers on front lines in fight against antibiotic resistance

As doctors in the Netherlands prepared a young girl for open heart surgery in the summer of 2004, they made a discovery that confused her medical team.

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Location is everything: Pollutants in yellowfin tuna depend on where it’s caught.

Fish is a highly nutritious food, but it can also be a dietary source of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).1 In a new study in EHP, researchers investigated the extent to which contaminant levels within a single commercially important fish species varied depending on where the fish was caught.2 Their results suggest that capture location may be an important yet overlooked variable when assessing the risk of exposure to POPs from eating wild fish.

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We can no longer outrun antibiotic resistance. Here’s what we need to do.

WE CAN NO LONGER OUTRUN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE. SO, HERE’S WHAT WE NEED TO DO INSTEAD.

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From our Newsroom

The draw—and deadlines—of American denial

From vaccines to elections to climate change, denial is doing lasting damage to the country.

What do politicians have to say about 'Fractured?'

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from politicians about our study that found Pennsylvania families living near fracking wells are being exposed to high levels of harmful industrial chemicals.

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Tucson's ambitious tree planting goal aims to improve the health of residents, wildlife, and the watershed.

“Allow suffering to speak:” Treating the oppressive roots of illness

By connecting the dots between medical symptoms and patterns of injustice, we move from simply managing suffering to delivering a lasting cure.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Living near fracking wells is linked to higher rate of heart attacks: Study

Middle-aged men in Pennsylvania's fracking counties die from heart attacks at a rate 5% greater than their counterparts in New York where fracking is banned.

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